salacious

[suh-ley-shuhs]
adjective
1.
lustful or lecherous.
2.
(of writings, pictures, etc.) obscene; grossly indecent.

Origin:
1635–45; < Latin salāci- (stem of salāx) lustful (derivative of salīre to jump, move spasmodically, spurt; see salient, saltation) + -ous

salaciously, adverb
salaciousness, salacity [suh-las-i-tee] , noun
unsalacious, adjective
unsalaciously, adverb
unsalaciousness, noun


1. lewd, wanton, lascivious, libidinous. 2. pornographic.


1. modest.
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World English Dictionary
salacious (səˈleɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  having an excessive interest in sex
2.  (of books, magazines, etc) erotic, bawdy, or lewd
 
[C17: from Latin salax fond of leaping, from salīre to leap]
 
sa'laciously
 
adv
 
sa'laciousness
 
n
 
salacity
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

salacious
1661, from L. salax (gen. salacis) "lustful," probably originally "fond of leaping," as in a male animal leaping on a female in sexual advances, from salire "to leap" (see salient). Earliest form of the word in Eng. is salacity (1605).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Usually, this applies to finances and property, but the judge could take
  salacious texts into account when deciding who gets what.
But the story is so much salacious fun that papers print it anyway.
The scandal is salacious, yes, but politically significant too.
Salacious stories, whether true or not, made for good entertainment.
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