scaffold

[skaf-uhld, -ohld]
noun
1.
a temporary structure for holding workers and materials during the erection, repair, or decoration of a building.
2.
an elevated platform on which a criminal is executed, usually by hanging.
3.
a raised platform or stage for exhibiting spectacles, seating spectators, etc.
4.
any raised framework.
5.
a suspended platform that is used by painters, window washers, and others for working on a tall structure, as a skyscraper.
6.
Metallurgy. any piling or fusion of materials in a blast furnace, obstructing the flow of gases and preventing the uniform descent of the charge.
7.
a system of raised frameworks; scaffolding.
verb (used with object)
8.
to furnish with a scaffold or scaffolding.
9.
to support by or place on a scaffold.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English scaffot, skaffaut, scaffalde < Old French escadafaut; akin to catafalque

unscaffolded, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scaffold (ˈskæfəld, -fəʊld)
 
n
1.  a temporary metal or wooden framework that is used to support workmen and materials during the erection, repair, etc, of a building or other construction
2.  a raised wooden platform on which plays are performed, tobacco, etc, is dried, or (esp formerly) criminals are executed
 
vb
3.  to provide with a scaffold
4.  to support by means of a scaffold
 
[C14: from Old French eschaffaut, from Vulgar Latin catafalicum (unattested); see catafalque]
 
'scaffolder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scaffold
c.1347 (implied in scaffolding), aphetic of an O.N.Fr. variant of O.Fr. eschafaut "scaffold," probably altered (by influence of eschace "a prop, support") from chaffaut, from V.L. *catafalicum (see catafalque).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Yet the scaffold nearly was banished because it was considered too repugnant
  for a gallery showing.
The idea of building body parts on a scaffold made of collagen by using a
  patient's own cells is not new.
Regrowing bone requires a scaffold that is stiff, long-lasting and safe.
In laboratory tests, the fabric scaffold that the researchers have created had
  the same mechanical properties as native cartilage.
Images for scaffold
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