seamy

[see-mee]
adjective, seamier, seamiest.
1.
unpleasant or sordid; low; disagreeable: the seamy side of life.
2.
having, showing, or of the nature of a seam.

Origin:
1595–1605; seam + -y1; in transferred senses alluding to the unpresentable appearance of the inside of a garment, i.e., where the seams show

seaminess, noun


1. squalid, rough, coarse, nasty.
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World English Dictionary
seamy (ˈsiːmɪ)
 
adj , seamier, seamiest
1.  showing the least pleasant aspect; sordid
2.  (esp of the inner side of a garment) showing many seams
 
'seaminess
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

seamy
1604, in fig. phrase seamy side "least pleasant, worst," from seam (q.v.), the seamy side of a sewn garment being the less attractive, and thus typically turned in. The popularity of the fig. sense likely is due to its use by Shakespeare in "Othello" IV.ii.146: "Some such Squire
he was That turn'd your wits the seamy-side without, And made you to suspect me with the Moore."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Still, he does not gloss over the seamy side of his episodes.
The seamy trade-offs necessary for growth and stability are denounced by
  zealots, delegitimizing the political process.
The seamy underbelly of the process is that it is messy.
There is one supermarket, however, that does not capitulate to this seamy
  practice.
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