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sear1

[seer] /sɪər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to burn or char the surface of:
She seared the steak to seal in the juices.
2.
to mark with a branding iron.
3.
to burn or scorch injuriously or painfully:
He seared his hand on a hot steam pipe.
4.
to make callous or unfeeling; harden:
The hardship of her youth has seared her emotionally.
5.
to dry up or wither; parch.
verb (used without object)
6.
to become dry or withered, as vegetation.
noun
7.
a mark or scar made by searing.
adjective
8.
sere1 .
Origin
900
before 900; (adj.) Middle English sere, Old English sēar; cognate with Dutch zoor; (v.) Middle English seren, Old English sēarian, derivative of sēar
Related forms
unseared, adjective
Synonyms
1. See burn1 .

sear2

[seer] /sɪər/
noun
1.
a pivoted piece that holds the hammer at full cock or half cock in the firing mechanism of small arms.
Origin
1550-60; < Middle French serre a grip, derivative of serrer to lock up, close < Vulgar Latin *serrāre, for Late Latin serāre to bar (a door), derivative of Latin sera door-bar; Vulgar Latin -rr- unexplained
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for sear
  • Raise heat to high, and sear duck pieces, stirring vegetables so they do not burn.
  • sear oyster mushrooms until wilted and lightly browned.
  • When using poppies as cut flowers, sear cut stem ends in a flame before placing them in water.
  • Using tongs, move the pieces and flatten them to sear all the shells evenly.
  • Then cool, pick the meat from the bone, and sear the chunks over high heat in a sauté pan to add a caramelized crispness.
  • When ready to eat grill, or sear quail for five minutes on each side, top with relish and serve.
  • sear for two more minutes and reduce heat to medium.
  • After about a minute or two, when they have begun to sear and release moisture, you can move them around in the pan.
  • Add scallops, and sear a minute or so, until lightly browned.
  • Turn the tuna over and sear on the other side, long enough to brown the outside but keeping the inside rare.
British Dictionary definitions for sear

sear1

/sɪə/
verb (transitive)
1.
to scorch or burn the surface of
2.
to brand with a hot iron
3.
to cause to wither or dry up
4.
(rare) to make callous or unfeeling
noun
5.
a mark caused by searing
adjective
6.
(poetic) dried up
Word Origin
Old English sēarian to become withered, from sēar withered; related to Old High German sōrēn, Greek hauos dry, Sanskrit sōsa drought

sear2

/sɪə/
noun
1.
the catch in the lock of a small firearm that holds the hammer or firing pin cocked
Word Origin
C16: probably from Old French serre a clasp, from serrer to hold firmly, from Late Latin sērāre to bolt, from Latin sera a bar

sere1

/sɪə/
adjective
1.
(archaic) dried up or withered
verb, noun
2.
a rare spelling of sear1 (sense 1)
Word Origin
Old English sēar; see sear1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sear
v.

Old English searian (intransitive) "dry up, to wither," from Proto-Germanic *saurajan (cf. Middle Dutch soor "dry," Old High German soren "become dry"), from root of sear "dried up, withered" (see sere). Meaning "cause to wither" is from early 15c. Meaning "to brand, to burn by hot iron" is recorded from c.1400, originally especially of cauterizing wounds; figurative use is from 1580s. Related: Seared; searing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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