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seedy

[see-dee] /ˈsi di/
adjective, seedier, seediest.
1.
abounding in seed.
2.
containing many seeds, as a piece of fruit.
3.
gone to seed; bearing seeds.
4.
poorly kept; run-down; shabby.
5.
shabbily dressed; unkempt:
a seedy old tramp.
6.
physically run-down; under the weather:
He felt a bit seedy after his operation.
7.
somewhat disreputable; degraded:
a seedy hotel.
Origin
1565-1575
1565-75; seed + -y1
Related forms
seedily, adverb
seediness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for seedy
  • Used poorly, e-mail can make the rejection process look downright seedy.
  • There were seedy characters surrounding me on the sidewalk.
  • It can be horrifyingly bitter if you get it when it's overmature and seedy.
  • He tells about the seedy lives of some of their neighbors.
  • Brinnin's lyrical description of the poet's seedy, romantic life was an introduction to the poem that followed.
  • seedy hotel rooms were quieter then, more media-sparse, enabling guests to hear the ticktock beneath their own thoughts.
  • He had his own, slightly seedy friends and could keep himself busy golfing and clubbing.
  • It's a good idea to familiarize yourself with any seedy pockets of any city as soon as you arrive.
  • The hotel went through a period with a seedy reputation.
  • When an investigator is working on a case, the environment might range from plush boardrooms to seedy bars.
British Dictionary definitions for seedy

seedy

/ˈsiːdɪ/
adjective seedier, seediest
1.
shabby or unseemly in appearance: seedy clothes
2.
(of a plant) at the stage of producing seeds
3.
(informal) not physically fit; sickly
Derived Forms
seedily, adverb
seediness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for seedy
adj.

mid-15c., "fruitful, abundant," from seed (n.) + -y (2). From 1570s as "abounding in seeds." Meaning "shabby" is from 1739, probably in reference to the appearance of a flowering plant that has run to seed. Related: Seediness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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