serjeanty

serjeanty

[sahr-juhn-tee]
noun Medieval English Law.
a form of land tenure in which a tenant holding of the king rendered him exclusive services in a status below that of a knight.
Also, sergeanty.


Origin:
1300–50; Middle English sergeantie, serjantie < Old French serjantie. See sergeant, -y3

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serjeanty

in European feudal society, a form of land tenure granted in return for the performance of a specific service to the lord, whether the king or another. Sergeants included artisans, bailiffs within the lord's realm, domestic servants, and sometimes those who provided the lord with some form of military service. When land was not available, the sergeants were maintained in the lord's household. Those who were tenants were subject to many feudal dues but were relieved of paying taxes and performing certain labours

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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