shaker

[shey-ker]
noun
1.
a person or thing that shakes.
2.
a container with a perforated top from which a seasoning, condiment, sugar, flour, or the like is shaken onto food.
3.
any of various containers for shaking beverages to mix the ingredients: a cocktail shaker.
4.
a dredger or caster.
5.
(initial capital letter) a member of the Millennial Church, originating in England in the middle of the 18th century and brought to the U.S. in 1774, advocating celibacy, common ownership of property, and a strict and simple way of life: so called from their practice of shaking during religious services.
adjective
6.
(initial capital letter) noting or pertaining to a style of something produced by Shakers and characterized by simplicity of form, lack of ornamentation, fine craftsmanship, and functionality.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see shake, -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
shaker (ˈʃeɪkə)
 
n
1.  a person or thing that shakes
2.  a container, often having a perforated top, from which something, such as a condiment, is shaken
3.  a container in which the ingredients of alcoholic drinks are shaken together

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shaker
c.1440, "one who or which shakes," from shake. Applied from 1648 (with capital initial) to various Christian sects whose devotional exercises often involved convulsions. The best-known, the American-based "Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing" so called from 1784;
the adj. with ref. to furniture styles associated with the Shakers is recorded from 1866. Meaning "container for mixing cocktails, etc." is recorded from 1868. Phrase movers and shakers is attested from 1874.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

shaker

see mover and shaker.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
It wants to be a mover and shaker in the world arena.
The rock salt applied to icy roads in the winter is the same substance that
  comes out of your salt shaker.
On-line buying cooperatives will make you a mover and shaker.
The second is whether or not the decisions were long lived, once put in the
  shaker it could have unforeseen biological damage.
Idioms & Phrases
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