shay

shay

[shey]
noun Chiefly Dialect.
a chaise.

Origin:
1710–20; respelling and back formation from chaise (taken as plural)

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Collins
World English Dictionary
shay (ʃeɪ)
 
n
a dialect word for chaise
 
[C18: back formation from chaise, mistakenly thought to be plural]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shay
1717, back-formation from chaise (q.v.) mistaken as a plural.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

shay

(French: "chair"), originally a closed, two-wheeled, one-passenger, one-horse carriage of French origin, adapted from the sedan chair. The carrying poles, or shafts, were attached to the horse's harness in front and fixed to the axle in back. The body of the carriage was set in front of the axle with its bottom lower than the shafts. The chaise body's position between the shafts provided stability but made side doors impossible, so that the passenger had an awkward climb over (or else had to duck under) the shafts in order to enter the carriage by a front door that opened downward. At first, the passenger drove the horse from within; later, the chaise was managed by a driver riding the horse

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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