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shingling

[shing-gling] /ˈʃɪŋ glɪŋ/
noun
1.
Geology. a sedimentary structure in which flat pebbles are uniformly tilted in the same direction.
Also called imbrication.
Origin of shingling
1695-1705
1695-1705, for literal sense; shingle1 + -ing1

shingle1

[shing-guh l] /ˈʃɪŋ gəl/
noun
1.
a thin piece of wood, slate, metal, asbestos, or the like, usually oblong, laid in overlapping rows to cover the roofs and walls of buildings.
2.
a woman's close-cropped haircut.
3.
Informal. a small signboard, especially as hung before a doctor's or lawyer's office.
verb (used with object), shingled, shingling.
4.
to cover with shingles, as a roof.
5.
to cut (hair) close to the head.
Idioms
6.
hang out one's shingle, Informal. to establish a professional practice, especially in law or medicine; open an office.
7.
have / be a shingle short, Australian Slang. to be mentally disturbed, mad, or eccentric.
Origin
1150-1200; Middle English scincle, sc(h)ingle < Medieval Latin scindula lath, shingle (Middle English -g- apparently by association with another unidentified word), Latin scandula (Medieval Latin -i- perhaps by association with Greek schíza lath, splinter, or related words)
Related forms
shingler, noun

shingle3

[shing-guh l] /ˈʃɪŋ gəl/
verb (used with object), shingled, shingling. Metalworking.
1.
to hammer or squeeze (puddled iron) into a bloom or billet, eliminating as much slag as possible; knobble.
Origin
1665-75; < French cingler to whip, beat < German zängeln, derivative of Zange tongs
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for shingling
Historical Examples
  • The shingling and plate-rolling mill is represented in fig. 597.

  • How is Tom getting on with his shingling or painting or whatever it is hes doing?

    The Lucky Seventh Ralph Henry Barbour
  • With shingles (procured from men who were shingling Dr. Macey's barn) we dug the pit and covered the grape leaf with earth.

    The Believing Years Edmund Lester Pearson
  • I hear him pounding nails all day long in the back yard, and he made a good job of shingling the woodshed the other day.

    The Adventures of a Boy Reporter Harry Steele Morrison
  • One June when he was shingling the old barn he engaged me to pick him some wild strawberries.

    My Boyhood John Burroughs
  • Commence to lay them from the ground, and work up to the cross-pole, shingling them carefully as you go.

    Woodcraft and Camping George Washington Sears (Nessmuk)
  • Another thing Mr. Gregg explained—the term, "a square of shingling."

  • Sounded as if he were shingling a roof, and that's work, you know, which must be done in fair weather.

    Gretchen Mary J. Holmes
  • All these pieces having been carefully nailed in place, the clapboarding or shingling of the sides can be done.

    Woodworking for Beginners Charles Gardner Wheeler
  • If well painted, such a roof will last for some time, but shingling is much better.

    Woodworking for Beginners Charles Gardner Wheeler
British Dictionary definitions for shingling

shingle1

/ˈʃɪŋɡəl/
noun
1.
a thin rectangular tile, esp one made of wood, that is laid with others in overlapping rows to cover a roof or a wall
2.
a woman's short-cropped hairstyle
3.
(US & Canadian) a small signboard or nameplate fixed outside the office of a doctor, lawyer, etc
4.
(Austral, informal) a shingle short, unintelligent or mentally subnormal
verb (transitive)
5.
to cover (a roof or a wall) with shingles
6.
to cut (the hair) in a short-cropped style
Derived Forms
shingler, noun
Word Origin
C12 scingle, from Late Latin scindula a split piece of wood, from Latin scindere to split

shingle2

/ˈʃɪŋɡəl/
noun
1.
coarse gravel, esp the pebbles found on beaches
2.
a place or area strewn with shingle
Derived Forms
shingly, adjective
Word Origin
C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian singl pebbles, Frisian singel gravel

shingle3

/ˈʃɪŋɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) (metallurgy) to hammer or squeeze the slag out of (iron) after puddling in the production of wrought iron
Word Origin
C17: from Old French dialect chingler to whip, from chingle belt, from Latin cingula girdle; see cingulum
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for shingling

shingle

n.

"thin piece of wood," c.1200, scincle, from Late Latin scindula (also the source of German Schindel), altered (by influence of Greek schidax "lath" or schindalmos "splinter") from Latin scandula "roof tile," from scindere "to cleave, split," from PIE root *sked- "to split." Meaning "small signboard" is first attested 1842. Sense of "woman's short haircut" is from 1924; the verb meaning "to cut the hair so as to give the impression of overlapping shingles" is from 1857.

"loose stones on a seashore," 1510s, probably related to Norwegian singl "small stones," or North Frisian singel "gravel," both said to be echoic of the sound of water running over pebbles.

v.

"cover with shingles" (of houses), 1560s, from shingle (n.). Related: Shingled; shingling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for shingling

shine up to someone

verb phrase

To court and flatter someone; curry favor; SUCKUPTO someone (1891+)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with shingling

shingle

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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14
18
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