silage

[sahy-lij]
noun
fodder preserved through fermentation in a silo; ensilage.

Origin:
1880–85; shortening of ensilage, influenced by silo

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Collins
World English Dictionary
silage (ˈsaɪlɪdʒ)
 
n
Also called: ensilage any crop harvested while green for fodder and kept succulent by partial fermentation in a silo
 
[C19: alteration (influenced by silo) of ensilage]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

silage
"fodder packed in a silo," 1884, alteration (probably by influence of silo) of ensilage (1881), from Fr. ensilage, from ensiler "put in a silo," from Sp. ensilar (see silo).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

Silage definition


Synchronous DSP specification language.
["Silage Reference Manual, Draft 1.0", D.R. Genin & P.N. Hilfinger, Silvar-Lisco, Leuven 1989].

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Silage crops are harvested, then stored under conditions that allow the forage
  to break down into acids.
Something about bagworms or feeding silage to horses or something.
The bread--wheat germ, he said--was rough as silage.
Corn silage is fed as a roughage in many feedlot-finishing diets.
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