sitin

sit-in

[sit-in]
noun
1.
an organized passive protest, especially against racial segregation, in which the demonstrators occupy seats prohibited to them, as in restaurants and other public places.
2.
any organized protest in which a group of people peacefully occupy and refuse to leave a premises: Sixty students staged a sit-in outside the dean's office.

Origin:
1955–60; noun use of verb phrase sit in (a place); cf. -in

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sit-in
 
n
1.  a form of civil disobedience in which demonstrators occupy seats in a public place and refuse to move as a protest
2.  another term for sit-down strike
 
vb
3.  (often foll by for) to deputize (for)
4.  (foll by on) to take part (in) as a visitor or guest: we sat in on Professor Johnson's seminar
5.  to organize or take part in a sit-in

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sit-in
1936, in ref. to session musicians; 1937, in ref. to union action; 1941, in ref. to student protests.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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