sit-in

[sit-in] /ˈsɪtˌɪn/
noun
1.
an organized passive protest, especially against racial segregation, in which the demonstrators occupy seats prohibited to them, as in restaurants and other public places.
2.
any organized protest in which a group of people peacefully occupy and refuse to leave a premises:
"Sixty students staged a sit-in outside the dean's office."
Origin
1955–60; noun use of verb phrase sit in (a place); cf. -in
British Dictionary definitions for sit-in
sit-in
 
n
1.  a form of civil disobedience in which demonstrators occupy seats in a public place and refuse to move as a protest
2.  another term for sit-down strike
 
vb
3.  (often foll by for) to deputize (for)
4.  (foll by on) to take part (in) as a visitor or guest: we sat in on Professor Johnson's seminar
5.  to organize or take part in a sit-in

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Word Origin and History for sit-in
sit-in
1936, in ref. to session musicians; 1937, in ref. to union action; 1941, in ref. to student protests.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang related to sit-in

sit-in

noun

An illegal occupation of a place in order to make a political or philosophical statement

[1960s+; the term was popularized during the movement for black civil rights and has many offspring: be-in, love-in, puke-in, etc]


Dictionary of American Slang
Copyright © 1986 by HarperCollins Publishers
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Encyclopedia Article for sit-in

a tactic of nonviolent civil disobedience. The demonstrators enter a business or a public place and remain seated until forcibly evicted or until their grievances are answered. Attempts to terminate the essentially passive sit-in often appear brutal, thus arousing sympathy for the demonstrators among moderates and noninvolved individuals. Following Mahatma Gandhi's teaching, Indians employed the sit-in to great advantage during their struggle for independence from the British. Later, the sit-in was adopted as a major tactic in the civil-rights struggle of American blacks; the first prominent sit-in occurred at a Greensboro (North Carolina) lunch counter in 1960. Student activists adopted the tactic later in the decade in demonstrations against the Vietnam War.

Learn more about sit-in with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Difficulty index for sit-in

Few English speakers likely know this word

Tile value for sit

3
3
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with sit-in