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slashing

[slash-ing] /ˈslæʃ ɪŋ/
noun
1.
a slash.
adjective
2.
sweeping; cutting.
3.
violent; severe:
a slashing wind.
4.
dashing; impetuous.
5.
vivid; flashing; brilliant.
6.
Informal. very large or fine; splendid:
a slashing fortune.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; slash1 + -ing1, -ing2
Related forms
slashingly, adverb

slash1

[slash] /slæʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cut with a violent sweeping stroke or by striking violently and at random, as with a knife or sword.
2.
to lash; whip.
3.
to cut, reduce, or alter:
The editors slashed the story to half its length.
4.
to make slits in (a garment) to show an underlying fabric.
5.
to criticize, censure, or attack in a savage or cutting manner.
verb (used without object)
6.
to lay about one with sharp, sweeping strokes; make one's way by cutting.
7.
to make a sweeping, cutting stroke.
noun
8.
a sweeping stroke, as with a knife, sword, or pen.
9.
a cut, wound, or mark made with such a stroke.
10.
a curtailment, reduction, or alteration:
a drastic slash of prices.
11.
a decorative slit in a garment showing an underlying fabric.
12.
13.
  1. an open area strewn with debris of trees from felling or from wind or fire.
  2. the debris itself.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English slaschen < ?
Related forms
unslashed, adjective
Synonyms
3. abridge, abbreviate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for slashing
  • Any minute, they thought, the metal would start slashing through his organs.
  • The new standards aim at slashing smog-forming and cancer-causing pollutants emitted during the oil and gas drilling process.
  • Few traditional colleges could carry out such growth while simultaneously slashing tuition.
  • Hurricanes bring winds and slashing rains that flood streets, flatten homes, and leave survivors struggling to pick up the pieces.
  • Probably padded with horsehair or wool, the helmet cap was made of hammered iron for protection from slashing or thrusting blades.
  • Charged with slashing the deficit by trillions, the new bipartisan commission could deadlock or reach a grand bargain.
  • The effect of you helping to argue for slashing manned space programs is not that money becomes available for science.
  • The answer, the team decided, was building up the green power infrastructure faster and slashing energy demand further.
  • But the potential backlash against slashing the bank's staff and getting it out of lending would surely be epic.
  • Resorts are slashing room rates and offering coupons or free nights.
British Dictionary definitions for slashing

slashing

/ˈslæʃɪŋ/
adjective
1.
aggressively or harshly critical (esp in the phrase slashing attack)
Derived Forms
slashingly, adverb

slash

/slæʃ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cut or lay about (a person or thing) with sharp sweeping strokes, as with a sword, knife, etc
2.
to lash with a whip
3.
to make large gashes in: to slash tyres
4.
to reduce (prices, etc) drastically
5.
(mainly US) to criticize harshly
6.
to slit (the outer fabric of a garment) so that the lining material is revealed
7.
to clear (scrub or undergrowth) by cutting
noun
8.
a sharp, sweeping stroke, as with a sword or whip
9.
a cut or rent made by such a stroke
10.
a decorative slit in a garment revealing the lining material
11.
(US & Canadian)
  1. littered wood chips and broken branches that remain after trees have been cut down
  2. an area so littered
12.
Also called diagonal, forward slash, separatrix, shilling mark, solidus, stroke, virgule. a short oblique stroke used in text to separate items of information, such as days, months, and years in dates (18/7/80), alternative words (and/or), numerator from denominator in fractions (55/103), etc
13.
(Brit, slang) the act of urinating (esp in the phrase have a slash)
14.
a genre of erotic fiction written by women, to appeal to women
Word Origin
C14 slaschen, perhaps from Old French esclachier to break
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for slashing

slash

v.

1540s, "to cut with a stroke of a blade or whip;" 1650s, "to strike violently," perhaps from Middle French esclachier "to break," variant of esclater "to break, splinter" (see slat). Meaning "to clear land" (of trees) is from 1821, American English. In reference to prices, it is attested from 1906. Related: Slashed; slashing. Slash-and-burn for a method of clearing forest for cultivation is from 1919.

n.

"a cutting stroke with a weapon," 1570s, from slash (v.); sense of "slit in a garment" is from 1610s; that of "open tract in a forest" is first attested 1825, American English. As a punctuation mark in writing or printing, it is recorded from 1961.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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