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slob

[slob] /slɒb/
noun
1.
a slovenly or boorish person.
2.
Irish English. mud or ooze, especially a stretch of mud along a shore.
3.
Chiefly Canadian. sludge (def 5).
Origin of slob
1770-1780
1770-80; < Irish slab(a) mud, mire
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for slob
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Pal Arthur is all very well, but at bossing a bit of a slob.

  • He's a big man and I'm a slob; but all of that doesn't seem to count with him.

    Mixed Faces Roy Norton
  • I think it is their dinner-time when the tide goes out and spreads a table-strip of slob for them on the shore.

  • Now it is "slob" mixed with snow born on the Newfoundland coast.

    A Labrador Doctor Wilfred Thomason Grenfell
  • slob; a soft fat quiet simple-minded girl or boy:—'Your little Nellie is a quiet poor slob': used as a term of endearment.

  • "You're a bossy sort of slob, Heslet Quillan," she said equably.

    Legacy James H Schmitz
  • "Never say't twice," says Jack, and he pitched in big stones and sods into the slob, till the ass got good ground under him.

  • What are you talking nonsense—act like a slob, Mr. Trinkmann?

    The Competitive Nephew Montague Glass
  • T' slob being very heavy outside, us lay for inside Belle Isle, and carried open water most across t' Straits.

    Labrador Days Wilfred Thomason Grenfell
British Dictionary definitions for slob

slob

/slɒb/
noun
1.
(informal) a slovenly, unattractive, and lazy person
2.
(Irish) mire
Derived Forms
slobbish, adjective
Word Origin
C19: from Irish slab mud; compare slab
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for slob
n.

1780, "mud, muddy land," from Irish slab "mud, mire dirt," itself probably borrowed from English slab "muddy place" (c.1600), from a Scandinavian source (cf. Icelandic slabb "sludge"). The meaning "untidy person" is first recorded 1887, from earlier expressions such as slob of a man (1861).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for slob

slip-up

noun

A miscalculation; an accident; glitch: There must have been a hell of a slip-up somewhere along the line (1874+)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Word Value for slob

6
8
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