slog

[slog]
verb (used with object), slogged, slogging.
1.
to hit hard, as in boxing or cricket; slug.
2.
to drive with blows.
verb (used without object), slogged, slogging.
3.
to deal heavy blows.
4.
to walk or plod heavily.
5.
to toil.
noun
6.
a long, tiring walk or march.
7.
long, laborious work.
8.
a heavy blow.

Origin:
1850–55; variant of slug2

slogger, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
slog (slɒɡ)
 
vb , slogs, slogging, slogged
1.  to hit with heavy blows, as in boxing
2.  (intr) to work hard; toil
3.  (intr; foll by down, up, along, etc) to move with difficulty; plod
4.  cricket to score freely by taking large swipes at the ball
 
n
5.  a tiring hike or walk
6.  long exhausting work
7.  a heavy blow or swipe
 
[C19: of unknown origin]
 
'slogger
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

slog
1824, "hit hard," probably variant of slug (3) "to strike." Sense of "walk doggedly" first recorded 1872; noun sense of "hard work" is from 1888.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Soon they were slogging away alongside her, into the evening and then-after a
  respite-returning the following morning.
Six weeks had been spent in steadily slogging our way down through the
  interminable series of rapids.
But her book is so detailed it can be slow slogging for readers who are not
  environmental historians.
The work of slogging through a spam trap to recover miscategorized messages is
  significantly reduced.
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