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slump

[sluhmp] /slʌmp/
verb (used without object)
1.
to drop or fall heavily; collapse:
Suddenly she slumped to the floor.
2.
to assume a slouching, bowed, or bent position or posture:
Stand up straight and don't slump!
3.
to decrease or fall suddenly and markedly, as prices or the market.
4.
to decline or deteriorate, as health, business, quality, or efficiency.
5.
to sink into a bog, muddy place, etc., or through ice or snow.
6.
to sink heavily, as the spirits.
noun
7.
an act or instance of slumping.
8.
a decrease, decline, or deterioration.
9.
a period of decline or deterioration.
10.
any mild recession in the economy as a whole or in a particular industry.
11.
a period during which a person performs slowly, inefficiently, or ineffectively, especially a period during which an athlete or team fails to play or score as well as usual.
12.
a slouching, bowed, or bent position or posture, especially of the shoulders.
13.
a landslide or rockslide.
14.
the vertical subsidence of freshly mixed concrete that is a measure of consistency and stiffness.
15.
New England Cookery. a dessert made with cooked fruit, especially apples or berries, topped with a thick layer of biscuit dough or crumbs.
Origin
1670-1680
1670-80; orig., to sink into a bog or mud; perhaps imitative (cf. plump2)
Related forms
unslumped, adjective
unslumping, adjective
Synonyms
8. lapse, reverse, setback.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for slump
  • While there has been a big slump recently in the retail price of sugar, the price at refineries has not dropped.
  • The slump may also exacerbate economic pressures that can damage the environment, he added.
  • Of course every actual slump has particular causes of its own but certain general causes are always present.
  • Amid a flash of fireworks, what's left of him falls to the ground in an anticlimactic slump.
  • They sort of slump down in the box, making a low, miserable hum.
  • And the company's share price held up in the bleakest slump the industry has ever seen.
  • Often there is an accompanying slump in occupational, cognitive or visual-spatial skills.
  • Much, of course, depends on the length and severity of the current slump.
  • The slump in the building trades in the past six months contrasts with an odd perkiness earlier.
  • Ford has survived the market slump largely because of its financial reserves, but it will have to sell some cars to thrive again.
British Dictionary definitions for slump

slump

/slʌmp/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to sink or fall heavily and suddenly
2.
to relax ungracefully
3.
(of business activity, etc) to decline suddenly; collapse
4.
(of health, interest, etc) to deteriorate or decline suddenly or markedly
5.
(of soil or rock) to slip down a slope, esp a cliff, usually with a rotational movement
noun
6.
a sudden or marked decline or failure, as in progress or achievement; collapse
7.
a decline in commercial activity, prices, etc
8.
(economics) another word for depression
9.
the act of slumping
10.
a slipping of earth or rock; landslide
Word Origin
C17: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Low German slump bog, Norwegian slumpa to fall

Slump

/slʌmp/
noun
1.
the Slump, another name for the Depression
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for slump
v.

1670s, "fall or sink into a muddy place," probably from a Scandinavian source, cf. Norwegian and Danish slumpe "fall upon," Swedish slumpa; perhaps ultimately of imitative origin. Related: Slumped; slumping.

The word "slump," or "slumped," has too coarse a sound to be used by a lady. [Eliza Leslie, "Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book," Philadelphia, 1839]
Economic sense from 1888.

n.

"act of slumping, slumping movement," 1850; "heavy decline in prices on the stock exchange," 1888, from slump (v.). Generalized by 1922 to "sharp decline in trade or business."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for slump

slump

noun
  1. A sudden decline or collapse, esp of economic value or activity: The stock market is in a dangerous slump (1888+)
  2. A period of bad performance: The whole team's in a hitting slump (1895+ Baseball)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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