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soaring

[sawr-ing, sohr-] /ˈsɔr ɪŋ, ˈsoʊr-/
noun
1.
the sport of flying a sailplane.
Origin
1895-1990
1895-90; soar + -ing1
Related forms
unsoaring, adjective

soar

[sawr, sohr] /sɔr, soʊr/
verb (used without object)
1.
to fly upward, as a bird.
2.
to fly at a great height, without visible movements of the pinions, as a bird.
3.
to glide along at a height, as an airplane.
4.
to rise or ascend to a height, as a mountain.
5.
to rise or aspire to a higher or more exalted level:
His hopes soared.
noun
6.
an act or instance of soaring.
7.
the height attained in soaring.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English soren < Middle French essorer < Vulgar Latin *exaurāre, equivalent to Latin ex- ex-1 + aur(a) air + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
soarer, noun
soaringly, adverb
Synonyms
1. See fly1 . 4. tower; mount.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for soaring
  • It combines the thrill of soaring through the air with the aesthetic pleasures of a bird's-eye view.
  • soaring summer temperatures can take a toll on many garden plants.
  • The soaring timbered ceiling had disappeared under tiles fitted with fluorescent lights.
  • It has a habit of occasionally soaring into the air and descending in loops and spirals.
  • The snowy owl is a patient hunter that perches and waits to identify its prey before soaring off in pursuit.
  • While autumn leaves tumble from trees this fall, another natural wonder is soaring overhead.
  • While leaves tumble from trees this fall, another natural wonder is soaring overhead.
  • Consumer demand for fish is soaring as well-established fisheries are becoming exhausted.
  • Seeds from the soaring trees were collected and distributed, and it soon became a popular ornamental in home gardens.
  • Meanwhile, the temperature swings during and between these ice ages became more extreme, soaring to new highs and lows.
British Dictionary definitions for soaring

soar

/sɔː/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to rise or fly upwards into the air
2.
(of a bird, aircraft, etc) to glide while maintaining altitude by the use of ascending air currents
3.
to rise or increase in volume, size, etc: soaring prices
noun
4.
the act of soaring
5.
the altitude attained by soaring
Derived Forms
soarer, noun
soaring, noun, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French essorer, from Vulgar Latin exaurāre (unattested) to expose to the breezes, from Latin ex-1 + aura a breeze
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for soaring

soar

v.

late 14c., from Old French essorer "fly up, soar," from Vulgar Latin *exaurare "rise into the air," from Latin ex- "out" (see ex-) + aura "breeze, air" (see aura). Of mountains, buildings, etc., by 1812; of prices, emotions, etc. from 1929. Related: Soared; soaring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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