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sodden

[sod-n] /ˈsɒd n/
adjective
1.
soaked with liquid or moisture; saturated.
2.
heavy, lumpy, or soggy, as food that is poorly cooked.
3.
having a soaked appearance.
4.
bloated, as the face.
5.
expressionless, dull, or stupid, especially from drunkenness.
6.
lacking spirit or alertness; inert; torpid; listless.
7.
Archaic. boiled.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
8.
to make or become sodden.
9.
Obsolete. past participle of seethe.
Origin of sodden
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English soden, sothen, past participle of sethen to seethe
Related forms
soddenly, adverb
soddenness, noun

seethe

[seeth] /sið/
verb (used without object), seethed or (Obsolete) sod; seethed or (Obsolete) sodden or sod; seething.
1.
to surge or foam as if boiling.
2.
to be in a state of agitation or excitement.
3.
Archaic. to boil.
verb (used with object), seethed or (Obsolete) sod; seethed or (Obsolete) sodden or sod; seething.
4.
to soak or steep.
5.
to cook by boiling or simmering; boil.
noun
6.
the act of seething.
7.
the state of being agitated or excited.
Origin
before 900; Middle English; Old English sēothan; cognate with German sieden, Swedish sjuda
Related forms
seethingly, adverb
unseethed, adjective
unseething, adjective
Synonyms
2. See boil1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for sodden
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • His heavy head dropped under water, and his sodden crest rolled over, like sea-weed where a wave breaks.

    Mary Anerley R. D. Blackmore
  • When dawn came, they were on the move, glad to stretch their sodden limbs.

    Slaves of Mercury Nat Schachner
  • Think of that, and then look at my picture of the sodden, filthy scarecrow!

    The Chequers James Runciman
  • Her hair, streaming down in a sodden mass, was matted with blood.

    The World Beyond Raymond King Cummings
  • Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof.

  • It creaked and gave back a sodden, hollow sound, but at first there was no response.

    The Plunderer Roy Norton
  • Turning her back, she pulled a sodden photograph from the front of her dress and handed it to her father.

    Danger at the Drawbridge Mildred A. Wirt
  • Even the fingers of Lane's gloves which gripped the wheel were sodden.

    Mr. Grex of Monte Carlo E. Phillips Oppenheim
British Dictionary definitions for sodden

sodden

/ˈsɒdən/
adjective
1.
completely saturated
2.
  1. dulled, esp by excessive drinking
  2. (in combination): a drink-sodden mind
3.
heavy or doughy, as bread is when improperly cooked
verb
4.
to make or become sodden
Derived Forms
soddenly, adverb
soddenness, noun
Word Origin
C13 soden, past participle of seethe

seethe

/siːð/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to boil or to foam as if boiling
2.
(intransitive) to be in a state of extreme agitation, esp through anger
3.
(transitive) to soak in liquid
4.
(transitive) (archaic) to cook or extract the essence of (a food) by boiling
noun
5.
the act or state of seething
Word Origin
Old English sēothan; related to Old Norse sjōtha, Old High German siodan to seethe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sodden
adj.

"soaked or softened in water," 1820, earlier "resembling something that has been boiled a long time" (1590s), originally "boiled" (c.1300), from Old English soden "boiled," strong past participle of seoþan "to cook, boil" (see seethe). For sense evolution from "heat in water" to "immerse in water" cf. bath.

seethe

v.

Old English seoþan "to boil," also figuratively, "be troubled in mind, brood" (class II strong verb; past tense seaþ, past participle soden), from Proto-Germanic *seuthan (cf. Old Norse sjoða, Old Frisian siatha, Dutch zieden, Old High German siodan, German sieden "to seethe"), from PIE root *seut- "to seethe, boil."

Driven out of its literal meaning by boil (v.); it survives largely in metaphoric extensions. Figurative use, of persons or populations, "to be in a state of inward agitation" is recorded from 1580s (implied in seething). It had wider figurative uses in Old English, e.g. "to try by fire, to afflict with cares." Now conjugated as a weak verb, and past participle sodden (q.v.) is no longer felt as connected.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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sodden in the Bible

to boil (Ex. 16:23).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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