someday

[suhm-dey]
adverb
at an indefinite future time.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English sum day, Old English sum dæg; see some, day


The adverb someday is written solid: Perhaps someday we will know the truth. The two-word form some day means “a specific but unnamed day”: We will reschedule the meeting for some day when everyone can attend.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
someday (ˈsʌmˌdeɪ)
 
adv
at some unspecified time in the (distant) future

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Example sentences
The secular cooling that must someday overtake our planet has already gone far
  indeed with our neighbour.
We revel in our my delusion of someday having my own comedy show.
Remember, the people you are serving alongside on a committee may someday be
  voting on your future promotion and tenure.
They must have the foresight and the imagination to see that all knowledge in
  some way, someday, will serve everyone.
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