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sophisticated

[suh-fis-ti-key-tid] /səˈfɪs tɪˌkeɪ tɪd/
adjective
1.
(of a person, ideas, tastes, manners, etc.) altered by education, experience, etc., so as to be worldly-wise; not naive:
a sophisticated young socialite; the sophisticated eye of a journalist.
2.
pleasing or satisfactory to the tastes of sophisticates:
sophisticated music.
3.
deceptive; misleading.
4.
complex or intricate, as a system, process, piece of machinery, or the like:
a sophisticated electronic control system.
5.
of, for, or reflecting educated taste, knowledgeable use, etc.:
Many Americans are drinking more sophisticated wines now.
Also, sophisticate.
Origin
1595-1605
1595-1605; < Medieval Latin sophisticāt(us) sophisticate + -ed2
Related forms
sophisticatedly, adverb
hypersophisticated, adjective
hypersophisticatedly, adverb
oversophisticated, adjective
supersophisticated, adjective
ultrasophisticated, adjective
ultrasophisticatedly, adverb
Synonyms
1. worldly, cosmopolitan, experienced, cultivated.
Antonyms
1. naive.

sophisticate

[n., adj. suh-fis-ti-kit, -keyt; v. suh-fis-ti-keyt] /n., adj. səˈfɪs tɪ kɪt, -ˌkeɪt; v. səˈfɪs tɪˌkeɪt/
noun
1.
a sophisticated person.
adjective
verb (used with object), sophisticated, sophisticating.
3.
to make less natural, simple, or ingenuous; make worldly-wise.
4.
to alter; pervert:
to sophisticate a meaning beyond recognition.
verb (used without object), sophisticated, sophisticating.
5.
to use sophistry; quibble.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English (adj. and v.) < Medieval Latin sophisticātus (past participle of sophisticāre to tamper with, disguise, trick with words), equivalent to Latin sophistic(us) (see sophistic) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
outsophisticate, verb (used with object), outsophisticated, outsophisticating.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for sophisticated
  • He expected odious solitary scavengers but instead found sophisticated hunters living in complex clans.
  • Psychology often takes simple behavioral data and tries to make it more complicated and sophisticated.
  • They're growing ever more complex, subtle, and sophisticated.
  • Without that knowledge the machines, no matter how advanced and sophisticated, are unproductive.
  • It is sophisticated and naïve simultaneously, sometimes in the same symbols that they use.
  • Traditional rudimentary forms became elegant and sophisticated, and the carvings reveal more attention to craft and detail.
  • sophisticated farmers, many of them big landowners, raced to buy the stuff.
  • Tool manufacturer product testing: not as sophisticated as you think.
  • And finally pantyhose give a sophisticated, polished, finished or professional appearance.
  • Although the rooms are sophisticated, their multifunctional materials and uses make them suited for kids and adults.
British Dictionary definitions for sophisticated

sophisticated

/səˈfɪstɪˌkeɪtɪd/
adjective
1.
having refined or cultured tastes and habits
2.
appealing to sophisticates a sophisticated restaurant
3.
unduly refined or cultured
4.
pretentiously or superficially wise
5.
(of machines, methods, etc) complex and refined
Derived Forms
sophisticatedly, adverb

sophisticate

verb (səˈfɪstɪˌkeɪt)
1.
(transitive) to make (someone) less natural or innocent, as by education
2.
to pervert or corrupt (an argument, etc) by sophistry
3.
(transitive) to make more complex or refined
4.
(rare) to falsify (a text, etc) by alterations
noun (səˈfɪstɪˌkeɪt; -kɪt)
5.
a sophisticated person
Derived Forms
sophistication, noun
sophisticator, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Medieval Latin sophisticāre, from Latin sophisticus sophistic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sophisticated
adj.

c.1600, "mixed with a foreign substance, impure; no longer simple or natural," past participle adjective from sophisticate (v.). Of persons, with a positive sense, "worldly-wise, discriminating, cultured," from 1895.

sophisticate

v.

c.1400, "make impure by admixture," from Medieval Latin sophisticatus, past participle of sophisticare (see sophistication). From c.1600 as "corrupt, delude by sophistry;" from 1796 as "deprive of simplicity." Related: Sophisticated; sophisticating. As a noun meaning "sophisticated person" from 1921.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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