sorcery

[sawr-suh-ree]
noun, plural sorceries.
the art, practices, or spells of a person who is supposed to exercise supernatural powers through the aid of evil spirits; black magic; witchery.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English sorcerie < Medieval Latin sorceria. See sorcerer, -y3


enchantment. See magic.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sorcery (ˈsɔːsərɪ)
 
n , pl -ceries
the art, practices, or spells of magic, esp black magic, by which it is sought to harness occult forces or evil spirits in order to produce preternatural effects in the world
 
[C13: from Old French sorcerie, from sorciersorcerer]
 
'sorcerous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sorcery
c.1300, from O.Fr. sorcerie, from sorcier "sorcerer," from V.L. *sortiarius, lit. "one who influences, fate, fortune," from L. sors (gen. sortis) "lot, fate, fortune" (see sort). Sorceress (late 14c.) is attested much earlier than sorcerer (1520s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

sorcery

the practice of malevolent magic, derived from casting lots as a means of divining the future in the ancient Mediterranean world. Some scholars distinguish sorcery from witchcraft by noting that it is learned rather than intrinsic. Other scholars, noting that modern witches claim to learn their craft, suggest that sorcery's intent is always evil and that of witchcraft can be either good or bad. In the early Christian era, the term was applied to any magician or wizard but by the Middle Ages only to those who allegedly practiced magic intended to harm others. In Western popular culture, and in Western children's literature in particular, the sorcerer often assumes a more positive guise.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
More than one pointed to the elbow when referring to witchcraft, indicating the
  site in the body where sorcery is said to reside.
But in time the potion exacts a price through clever sorcery, leaving you alone
  and stranded amid a bleak landscape.
The words were well cloaked in her gentlest voice, her hardy optimism, her
  subtle sorcery.
Unfortunately, his audience thought he used sorcery.
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