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squall1

[skwawl] /skwɔl/
noun
1.
a sudden, violent gust of wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
2.
a sudden disturbance or commotion.
verb (used without object)
3.
to blow as a squall.
Origin
1690-1700
1690-1700; perhaps special use of squall2
Related forms
squallish, adjective

squall2

[skwawl] /skwɔl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to cry or scream loudly and violently:
The hungry baby began to squall.
verb (used with object)
2.
to utter in a screaming tone.
noun
3.
the act or sound of squalling:
The baby's squall was heard next door.
Origin
1625-35; perhaps < Old Norse skvala shriek, cry; compare Swedish, Norwegian skvala splash, stream
Related forms
squaller, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for squall
  • We did get blown around a bit by this squall but thankfully managed to avoid the water spout.
  • It counts the destruction of the redwoods and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic squall.
  • On a clear day, they resemble the jawbone of a shark and bear the aggrieved purple color of an approaching squall.
  • In the wee hours, a sudden snow squall descended on the mountain, smothering the climbers in blowing snow.
  • The decision to show his work, at long last, has kicked up a summer squall here.
  • Here the program opens with the rumble of thunder up close, followed by the squall of a fanfare for shofars.
  • Straight line winds, found with many squall lines, are more common than tornadoes here.
  • squall lines have long been recognized as producers of severe weather.
British Dictionary definitions for squall

squall1

/skwɔːl/
noun
1.
a sudden strong wind or brief turbulent storm
2.
any sudden commotion or show of temper
verb
3.
(intransitive) to blow in a squall
Derived Forms
squallish, adjective
squally, adjective
Word Origin
C18: perhaps a special use of squall²

squall2

/skwɔːl/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to cry noisily; yell
noun
2.
a shrill or noisy yell or howl
Derived Forms
squaller, noun
Word Origin
C17: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic skvala to shout; see squeal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for squall
n.

"sudden, violent gust of wind," 1719, originally nautical, probably from a Scandinavian source (cf. Norwegian skval "sudden rush of water," Swedish skvala "to gush, pour down"), probably ultimately a derivative of squall (v.).

v.

"cry out loudly," 1630s, probably from Old Norse skvala "to cry out," of imitative origin (cf. squeal). Related: Squalled; squalling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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squall in Science
squall
  (skwôl)   
A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow. A squall is said to occur if a wind having a sustained speed of 40 km (25 mi) per hour lasts at least 1 minute and then decreases rapidly. See also squall line.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for squall

as used by weather forecasters, a sudden wind-speed increase of 8 metres per second (18 miles per hour) or more, for one minute or longer. It includes several briefer wind-speed changes, or gusts. A squall is often named for the weather phenomenon that accompanies it, such as rain, hail, or thunder; a line squall is one associated with a squall line of thunderstorms that is often hundreds of kilometres long.

Learn more about squall with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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