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stifling

[stahy-fling] /ˈstaɪ flɪŋ/
adjective
1.
suffocating; oppressively close:
the stifling atmosphere of the cavern.
Origin
1550-1560
1550-60; stifle1 + -ing2
Related forms
stiflingly, adverb
unstifling, adjective

stifle1

[stahy-fuh l] /ˈstaɪ fəl/
verb (used with object), stifled, stifling.
1.
to quell, crush, or end by force:
to stifle a revolt; to stifle free expression.
2.
to suppress, curb, or withhold:
to stifle a yawn.
3.
to kill by impeding respiration; smother.
verb (used without object), stifled, stifling.
4.
to suffer from difficulty in breathing, as in a close atmosphere.
5.
to become stifled or suffocated.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English < Old Norse stīfla to stop up, dam, akin to stīfr stiff
Related forms
stifler, noun
unstifled, adjective
Synonyms
1. prevent, preclude, put down. 2. check. 3. suffocate, strangle, choke.
Antonyms
1, 2. encourage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for stifling
  • Green chemistry focuses on eliminating the use of toxic chemicals in chemistry without stifling scientific progress.
  • Moreover, there are signs that the chaebol may be stifling innovation and entrepreneurship.
  • When coral bleaches, seaweed can grow out of control, stifling reef recovery.
  • Nations need to curb their public debt to avoid stifling future growth.
  • The laws protecting software code are stifling creativity, destroying knowledge, and betraying the public trust.
  • Some colleagues share my concern, but worry about stifling academic freedom.
  • Far from stifling him, the government endorses his criticisms.
  • In these warm tropical waters, with a half dozen people inside, our small laboratory would rapidly become stifling.
  • All these complaints about consensus being stifling miss the mark.
  • Could feel stifling for those inexperienced with compression clothing.
British Dictionary definitions for stifling

stifling

/ˈstaɪflɪŋ/
adjective
1.
oppressively hot or stuffy: a stifling atmosphere
Derived Forms
stiflingly, adverb

stifle1

/ˈstaɪfəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to smother or suppress: stifle a cough
2.
to feel or cause to feel discomfort and difficulty in breathing
3.
to prevent or be prevented from breathing so as to cause death
4.
(transitive) to crush or stamp out
Derived Forms
stifler, noun
Word Origin
C14: variant of stuflen, probably from Old French estouffer to smother

stifle2

/ˈstaɪfəl/
noun
1.
the joint in the hind leg of a horse, dog, etc, between the femur and tibia
Word Origin
C14: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for stifling

stifle

v.

late 14c., "to choke, suffocate, drown," of uncertain origin, possibly an alteration of Old French estouffer "to stifle, smother," which may be from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German stopfon "to plug up, stuff"). Metaphoric sense is from 1570s. Related: Stifled; stifling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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