stodgy

[stoj-ee]
adjective, stodgier, stodgiest.
1.
heavy, dull, or uninteresting; tediously commonplace; boring: a stodgy Victorian novel.
2.
of a thick, semisolid consistency; heavy, as food.
3.
stocky; thick-set.
4.
old-fashioned; unduly formal and traditional: a stodgy old gentleman.
5.
dull; graceless; inelegant: a stodgy business suit.

Origin:
1815–25; stodge + -y1

stodgily, adverb
stodginess, noun


1. tiresome, stuffy, prosaic.


1. lively, exciting.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
stodgy (ˈstɒdʒɪ)
 
adj , stodgier, stodgiest
1.  (of food) heavy or uninteresting
2.  excessively formal and conventional
 
[C19: from stodge]
 
'stodgily
 
adv
 
'stodginess
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

stodgy
1823, "of a thick, semi-solid consistency," from stodge "to stuff" (1674), of unknown origin, perhaps somehow imitative. Meaning "dull, heavy" developed by 1874 from noun sense of stodge applied to food (1825).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The latter perceive the former as stodgy, authoritarian and boring.
See scenes of the new city, whose image has changed from stodgy to exciting.
Education, and higher education in particular, is such a stodgy industry with
  antiquated practices.
Artists rebelled against the stodgy mores of the bourgeoisie.
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