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[stren-yoo-uh s] /ˈstrɛn yu əs/
characterized by vigorous exertion, as action, efforts, life, etc.:
a strenuous afternoon of hunting.
demanding or requiring vigorous exertion; laborious:
To think deeply is a strenuous task.
vigorous, energetic, or zealously active:
a strenuous person; a strenuous intellect.
Origin of strenuous
1590-1600; < Latin strēnuus; see -ous
Related forms
strenuously, adverb
strenuousness, strenuosity
[stren-yoo-os-i-tee] /ˌstrɛn yuˈɒs ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
quasi-strenuous, adjective
quasi-strenuously, adverb
superstrenuous, adjective
superstrenuously, adverb
superstrenuousness, noun
unstrenuous, adjective
unstrenuously, adverb
unstrenuousness, noun
3. forceful. See active.
2. easy. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for strenuously
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • She attributed them to jealousy and envy, and strenuously defended his name.

    Cecil Rhodes Princess Catherine Radziwill
  • They did not strenuously urge me to return to the bank, and that seemed strange to me.

    The Rise of Roscoe Paine Joseph C. Lincoln
  • They strenuously opposed the introduction of its opening sentences.

  • And if he loses that your uncle would no longer support so strenuously his suit with you.

    Love-at-Arms Raphael Sabatini
  • He was about speaking further, when he was pulled down by his friends, who strenuously urged him to keep silent.

    Bits of Blarney R. Shelton Mackenzie
British Dictionary definitions for strenuously


requiring or involving the use of great energy or effort
characterized by great activity, effort, or endeavour
Derived Forms
strenuosity (ˌstrɛnjʊˈɒsɪtɪ), strenuousness, noun
strenuously, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin strēnuus brisk, vigorous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for strenuously



"characterized by great effort," 1590s, from Latin strenuus "active, vigorous, keen." Probably cognate with Greek strenes, strenos "keen, strong," strenos "arrogance, eager desire," Old English stierne "hard, severe, keen" (see stern (adj.)). Mocked by Ben Jonson as a pedantic neologism in "Poetaster" (1601). Sense of "requiring much energy" is first recorded 1670s. Related: Strenuously; strenuousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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