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strutting

[struht-ing] /ˈstrʌt ɪŋ/
adjective
1.
walking or moving with a strut; walking pompously; pompous.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English; see strut1, -ing2
Related forms
struttingly, adverb

strut1

[struht] /strʌt/
verb (used without object), strutted, strutting.
1.
to walk with a vain, pompous bearing, as with head erect and chest thrown out, as if expecting to impress observers.
noun
2.
the act of strutting.
3.
a strutting walk or gait.
Idioms
4.
strut one's stuff, to dress, behave, perform, etc., one's best in order to impress others; show off.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English strouten to protrude stiffly, swell, bluster, Old English strūtian to struggle, derivative of *strūt (whence Middle English strut strife)
Related forms
strutter, noun
Synonyms
1. parade, flourish. Strut and swagger refer especially to carriage in walking. Strut implies swelling pride or pompousness; to strut is to walk with a stiff, pompous, seemingly affected or self-conscious gait: A turkey struts about the barnyard. Swagger implies a domineering, sometimes jaunty, superiority or challenge, and a self-important manner: to swagger down the street.

strut2

[struht] /strʌt/
noun
1.
any of various structural members, as in trusses, primarily intended to resist longitudinal compression.
verb (used with object), strutted, strutting.
2.
to brace or support by means of a strut or struts.
Origin
1565-75; obscurely akin to strut1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for strutting
  • Follow these expert tips and you'll be strutting out with more friendship bracelets and plastic harmonicas than you can carry.
  • strutting about, the performers bowed while deep notes boomed from the resonant air sacs.
  • She kicked her foot over the furrow, and with mouth drawn down shook her head once or twice in a little strutting way.
  • Across the capitalist world, once-strutting tycoons are begging for state bail-outs.
  • Models in dagger-emblazoned silk dresses strutting while talking on cell phones.
  • Check out these pooches and kitties strutting their stuff.
  • Molly has taken to strutting around outside, showing it off and putting in double caps to really make it pop.
  • After spraining her ankle the previous night, she let a tap dancer do all the strutting mid-set on a different song.
  • Leks where it is known that there was no strutting activity through the course of a strutting season.
  • Females arrive about a week later and are courted by the males, who display by strutting and shaking their wings.
British Dictionary definitions for strutting

strut

/strʌt/
verb struts, strutting, strutted
1.
(intransitive) to walk in a pompous manner; swagger
2.
(transitive) to support or provide with struts
3.
(informal) strut one's stuff, to behave or perform in a proud and confident manner; show off
noun
4.
a structural member used mainly in compression, esp as part of a framework
5.
an affected, proud, or stiff walk
Derived Forms
strutter, noun
strutting, adjective
struttingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14 strouten (in the sense: swell, stand out; C16: to walk stiffly), from Old English strūtian to stand stiffly; related to Low German strutt stiff
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for strutting

strut

v.

"walk in a vain, important manner," Old English strutian "to stand out stiffly," from Proto-Germanic *strut- (cf. Danish strutte, German strotzen "to be puffed up, be swelled," German Strauß "fight"), from PIE root *ster- "strong, firm, stiff, rigid" (see sterile). Originally of the air or the attitude; modern sense, focused on the walk, first recorded 1510s. Cognate with Old English ðrutung "anger, arrogance" (see throat). To strut (one's) stuff is black slang, first recorded 1926, from strut as the name of a dance popular from c.1900.

n.

"supporting brace," 1580s, perhaps from strut (v.), or a cognate word in Old Norse or Low German (cf. Low German strutt "rigid"); ultimately from Proto-Germanic *strutoz-, from root *strut- (see strut (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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