subordinate

[adj., n. suh-bawr-dn-it; v. suh-bawr-dn-eyt]
adjective
1.
placed in or belonging to a lower order or rank.
2.
of less importance; secondary.
3.
subject to or under the authority of a superior.
4.
subservient or inferior.
5.
subject; dependent.
6.
Grammar.
a.
acting as a modifier, as when I finished, which is subordinate to They were glad in They were glad when I finished.
b.
noting or pertaining to a subordinating conjunction.
7.
Obsolete, submissive.
noun
8.
a subordinate person or thing.
verb (used with object), subordinated, subordinating.
9.
to place in a lower order or rank.
10.
to make secondary (usually followed by to ): to subordinate work to pleasure.
11.
to make subject, subservient, or dependent (usually followed by to ): to subordinate passion to reason.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English (adj.) < Medieval Latin subōrdinātus past participle of subōrdināre to subordinate, equivalent to Latin sub- sub- + ōrdin- (stem of ōrdō) rank, order + -ātus -ate1

subordinately, adverb
subordinateness, noun
subordination, subordinacy [suh-bawr-dn-uh-see] , noun
subordinative [suh-bawr-dn-ey-tiv, -bawr-dn-uh-] , adjective
nonsubordinate, adjective
nonsubordinating, adjective
presubordinate, verb (used with object), presubordinated, presubordinating.
self-subordinating, adjective
unsubordinate, adjective
unsubordinative, adjective


2. ancillary. 8. inferior, subject. 9. lower, reduce.


2. superior; primary.
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World English Dictionary
subordinate
 
adj
1.  of lesser order or importance
2.  under the authority or control of another: a subordinate functionary
 
n
3.  a person or thing that is subordinate
 
vb (usually foll by to)
4.  to put in a lower rank or position (than)
5.  to make subservient: to subordinate mind to heart
 
[C15: from Medieval Latin subordināre, from Latin sub- + ordō rank]
 
sub'ordinately
 
adv
 
subordi'nation
 
n
 
sub'ordinateness
 
n
 
sub'ordinative
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

subordinate
1456, from M.L. subordinatus "placed in a lower order, made subject," pp. of subordinare "place in a lower order," from L. sub "under" + ordinare "arrange" (see ordain). The verb meaning "to bring into a subordinate position" is recorded from 1597.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Subsequent measurements six months later allowed the researchers to compare
  growth rates of dominant and subordinate females.
Silverbacks at times neglect subordinate females in favor of the more dominant
  and senior ones.
These bouts determine hierarchies among males, and dominant males mate more
  often than subordinate ones do.
Videos don't have to be subordinate advertising material for albums, and dance
  doesn't have to be confined to the theater.
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