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subsidy

[suhb-si-dee] /ˈsʌb sɪ di/
noun, plural subsidies.
1.
a direct pecuniary aid furnished by a government to a private industrial undertaking, a charity organization, or the like.
2.
a sum paid, often in accordance with a treaty, by one government to another to secure some service in return.
3.
a grant or contribution of money.
4.
money formerly granted by the English Parliament to the crown for special needs.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English subsidie < Anglo-French < Latin subsidium auxiliary force, reserve, help, equivalent to sub- sub- + sid-, combining form of sedēre to sit1 + -ium -ium
Related forms
antisubsidy, noun, plural antisubsidies.
nonsubsidy, noun, plural nonsubsidies.
Synonyms
1. Subsidy, subvention are both grants of money, especially governmental, to aid private undertakings. A subsidy is usually given to promote commercial enterprise: a subsidy to manufacturers during a war. A subvention is usually a grant to stimulate enterprises connected with science and the arts: a subvention to a research chemist by a major company.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for subsidy
  • These projects are mostly politically driven and run mainly on external money sources and subsidy other than own generated funds.
  • Sceptics therefore doubt that the subsidy is a good use of public money.
  • It needs the money to pay wages and an electricity subsidy and to invest in farming.
  • Some might be inclined to call that a state subsidy.
  • All the while, it gave a giant tax subsidy to mortgage interest that convinced people they were fools not to buy.
  • The other thing that needs to be done is stop federal subsidy of flood insurance.
  • If you think that's a subsidy, then your entire paycheck is nothing more than a subsidy.
  • Give me one single current subsidy for nuclear power.
  • Wind turbine operation is profitable so government subsidy is required only to enhance start-up.
  • Besides being a red herring, that fiction is made possible by changing the word deduction to subsidy.
British Dictionary definitions for subsidy

subsidy

/ˈsʌbsɪdɪ/
noun (pl) -dies
1.
a financial aid supplied by a government, as to industry, for reasons of public welfare, the balance of payments, etc
2.
(English history) a financial grant made originally for special purposes by Parliament to the Crown
3.
any monetary contribution, grant, or aid
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-Norman subsidie, from Latin subsidium assistance, from subsidēre to remain, from sub- down + sedēre to sit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for subsidy
n.

late 14c., from Anglo-French subsidie, from Old French subside "help, aid, contribution," from Latin subsidium "help, aid, assistance, (military) reinforcements," from sub "behind, near" (see sub-) + sedere "to sit" (see sedentary).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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subsidy in Culture

subsidy definition


A grant made by a government to some individual or business in order to maintain an acceptable standard of living or to stimulate economic growth.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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13
14
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