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suppose

[suh-pohz]
verb (used with object), supposed, supposing.
1.
to assume (something), as for the sake of argument or as part of a proposition or theory: Suppose the distance to be one mile.
2.
to consider (something) as a possibility suggested or an idea or plan proposed: Suppose we wait until tomorrow.
3.
to believe or assume as true; take for granted: It is supposed that his death was an accident.
4.
to think or hold as an opinion: What do you suppose he will do?
5.
to require logically; imply; presuppose: The evidence supposes his presence near the scene.
6.
(used in the passive) to expect or design; require or permit (followed by an infinitive verb): The machine is supposed to make noise. I'm not supposed to run fast.
verb (used without object), supposed, supposing.
7.
to assume something; presume; think.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English supposen < Old French supposer, equivalent to sup- sup- + poser to pose1; compare Medieval Latin suppōnere to suppose, Latin: to substitute, place below

supposable, adjective
supposably, adverb
supposer, noun
missuppose, verb, missupposed, missupposing.
unsupposable, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
suppose (səˈpəʊz)
 
vb
1.  to presume (something) to be true without certain knowledge: I suppose he meant to kill her
2.  to consider as a possible suggestion for the sake of discussion, elucidation, etc; postulate: suppose that he wins the election
3.  (of theories, propositions, etc) to imply the inference or assumption (of): your policy supposes full employment
 
[C14: from Old French supposer, from Medieval Latin suppōnere, from Latin: to substitute, from sub- + pōnere to put]
 
sup'posable
 
adj
 
sup'poser
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

suppose
early 14c., "to assume as the basis of argument," from O.Fr. supposer "to assume," probably a replacement of *suppondre (influenced by O.Fr. poser "put, place"), from L. supponere "put or place under," from sub "under" + ponere "put, place" (see position). Meaning "to admit
as possible, to believe to be true" is from 1520s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Supposing that another life form had reached human intelligence level, and then
  survived, for another million years.
Indeed that could be the point, supposing it deters free-riders.
The debate still continues over whether further stimulus would be helpful,
  supposing politics or the financial markets allowed it.
To reduce technological progress-even supposing one could do it-would be to
  condemn poor countries to stay poor.
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