swampy

[swom-pee]
adjective, swampier, swampiest.
1.
of the nature of, resembling, or abounding in swamps.
2.
found in swamps.

Origin:
1640–50; swamp + -y1

swampiness, noun
unswampy, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
swamp (swɒmp)
 
n
1.  a.  Compare marsh permanently waterlogged ground that is usually overgrown and sometimes partly forested
 b.  (as modifier): swamp fever
 
vb
2.  to drench or submerge or be drenched or submerged
3.  nautical to cause (a boat) to sink or fill with water or (of a boat) to sink or fill with water
4.  to overburden or overwhelm or be overburdened or overwhelmed, as by excess work or great numbers: we have been swamped with applications
5.  to sink or stick or cause to sink or stick in or as if in a swamp
6.  (tr) to render helpless
 
[C17: probably from Middle Dutch somp; compare Middle High German sumpf, Old Norse svöppr sponge, Greek somphos spongy]
 
'swampish
 
adj
 
'swampless
 
adj
 
'swampy
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
The bottom land here was swampy and bad for the operations of troops, making a
  good place to get an enemy into.
For centuries the region supported savannahs full of wildlife, lush acacia
  forests, and areas so swampy they were uninhabitable.
They expanded an island in the swampy lake and connected it to the mainland
  through roads.
The catfish has successfully adapted to life in swampy patches of forest
  terrain, the researchers say.
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