swelter

[swel-ter]
verb (used without object)
1.
to suffer from oppressive heat.
verb (used with object)
2.
to oppress with heat.
3.
Archaic. to exude, as venom.
noun
4.
a sweltering condition.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English swelt(e)ren (v.), equivalent to swelt(en) to be overcome with heat (Old English sweltan to die; cognate with Old Norse svelta, Gothic swiltan) + -eren -er6

unsweltered, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
swelter (ˈswɛltə)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to suffer under oppressive heat, esp to sweat and feel faint
2.  archaic (tr) to exude (venom)
3.  rare (tr) to cause to suffer under oppressive heat
 
n
4.  a sweltering condition (esp in the phrase in a swelter)
5.  oppressive humid heat
 
[C15 swelten, from Old English sweltan to die; related to Old Norse svelta to starve, Old High German swelzan to burn with passion; see sultry]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

swelter
c.1403, frequentative of swelten "be faint (especially with heat)," c.1386, from O.E. sweltan "to die," from P.Gmc. *swel- (cf. O.S. sweltan "to die," O.N. svelta "to put to death, starve," Goth. sviltan "to die"), originally "to burn slowly," hence "to be overcome with heat or fever;" also the source
of O.E. swelan "to burn," from PIE base *swel- "to shine, burn" (see Selene). For specialization of words meaning "to die," cf. starve.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Museum curators often open their best shows in the fall, when the cooling off from the summer swelter seems to spark energy.
But he also knows that he is going to swelter, and maybe stumble, and possibly snag a sleeve in a car or bus door.
Act now be sure you won't swelter and suffer during the hot humid days and nights.
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