synthetase

synthetase

[sin-thuh-teys, -teyz]
noun Biochemistry.

Origin:
1947; synthet(ic) + -ase

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synthetase syn·the·tase (sĭn'thĭ-tās', -tāz')
n.
See ligase.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

synthetase

any one of a class of about 50 enzymes that catalyze reactions involving the conservation of chemical energy and provide a couple between energy-demanding synthetic processes and energy-yielding breakdown reactions. They catalyze the joining of two molecules, deriving the needed energy from the cleavage of an energy-rich phosphate bond (in many cases, by the simultaneous conversion of adenosine triphosphate [ATP] to adenosine diphosphate [ADP]). A ligase catalyzing the formation of a carbon-oxygen bond between an amino acid and transfer RNA is called amino acid-RNA ligase. Carbon-nitrogen (CN) bonds are formed by the action of such enzymes as amide synthetases and peptide synthetases.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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