tempestuous

[tem-pes-choo-uhs]
adjective
1.
characterized by or subject to tempests: the tempestuous ocean.
2.
of the nature of or resembling a tempest: a tempestuous wind.
3.
tumultuous; turbulent: a tempestuous period in history.

Origin:
1500–10; < Late Latin tempestuōsus, derivative of tempestus, variant of tempestās tempest (see -ous); replacing earlier tempeste(u)ous, tempestious (see -eous, -ious)

tempestuously, adverb
tempestuousness, noun
untempestuous, adjective
untempestuously, adverb
untempestuousness, noun


2. violent, stormy.
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World English Dictionary
tempestuous (tɛmˈpɛstjʊəs)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to a tempest
2.  violent or stormy: a tempestuous love affair
 
tem'pestuously
 
adv
 
tem'pestuousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tempestuous
mid-15c., from L. tempestuosus, from tempestas (see tempest). The figurative sense is older in English; literal sense is from c.1500. Related: Tempestuously.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The moon had been up for some time, but had been quite concealed by tempestuous clouds.
Between bursts of tempestuous movement, he slumped on a three-legged stool and glowered.
Because of its size and depth and the area's prevailing winds, the lake can sometimes be whipped into a tempestuous inland ocean.
Her parents seem to have had a tempestuous marriage.
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