tortuously

tortuous

[tawr-choo-uhs]
adjective
1.
full of twists, turns, or bends; twisting, winding, or crooked: a tortuous path.
2.
not direct or straightforward, as in procedure or speech; intricate; circuitous: tortuous negotiations lasting for months.
3.
deceitfully indirect or morally crooked, as proceedings, methods, or policy; devious.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin tortuōsus, equivalent to tortu(s) a twisting (tor(quēre) to twist, bend + -tus suffix of v. action) + -ōsus -ous

tortuously, adverb
tortuousness, noun
nontortuous, adjective
nontortuously, adverb
untortuous, adjective
untortuously, adverb
untortuousness, noun

tortuous, torturous (see usage note at torturous).


1. bent, sinuous, serpentine. 2. evasive, roundabout, indirect.


See torturous.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tortuous (ˈtɔːtjʊəs)
 
adj
1.  twisted or winding: a tortuous road
2.  devious or cunning: a tortuous mind
3.  intricate
 
'tortuously
 
adv
 
'tortuousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tortuous
c.1391, from Anglo-Fr. tortuous (12c.), from L. tortuosus "full of twists, winding," from tortus "a twisting, winding," from stem of torquere "to twist, wring, distort" (see thwart).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

tortuous tor·tu·ous (tôr'chōō-əs)
adj.
Having many turns; winding or twisting.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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