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toxin

[tok-sin] /ˈtɒk sɪn/
noun
1.
any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.
Origin
1885-1890
1885-90; tox(ic) + -in2
Can be confused
toxic, toxin.
Synonyms
See poison.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for toxins
  • But his nervous system had begun to be affected through the toxins evolved by the bacillus of his disease.
  • Lionfish flesh isn't poisonous, and heat neutralizes the spines' toxins.
  • They have found that bees cannot make an enzyme that other insects use to help eliminate toxins from the body.
  • Levels of some toxins in fish have declined, but others pose new risks.
  • Industrial pollution has suffused their bodies with heavy metals and toxins.
  • They quickly developed a shoebox-sized prototype capable of detecting toxins, including ricin and anthrax.
  • There are other toxins in our world besides vaccines.
  • These cyborgs are controlled by wireless signals and can deliver toxins to a human body.
  • The bosses have had no qualms about saturating their towns with toxins and letting the lands that surround their estates go bad.
  • When they are threatened, the nudibranchs release the toxins into the water around them.
British Dictionary definitions for toxins

toxin

/ˈtɒksɪn/
noun
1.
any of various poisonous substances produced by microorganisms that stimulate the production of neutralizing substances (antitoxins) in the body See also endotoxin, exotoxin
2.
any other poisonous substance of plant or animal origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for toxins

toxin

n.

"organic poison," especially one produced by bacteria in an animal body, 1886, from toxic + -in (2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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toxins in Medicine

toxin tox·in (tŏk'sĭn)
n.
A poisonous substance, especially a protein, that is produced by living cells or organisms and is capable of causing disease when introduced into the body tissues but is often also capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies or antitoxins.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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toxins in Science
toxin
  (tŏk'sĭn)   
A poisonous substance, especially one produced by a living organism. Toxins can be products or byproducts of ordinary metabolism, such as lactic acid, and they must be broken down or excreted before building up to dangerous levels. Toxins can facilitate survival, as with snake venom that kills or immobilizes prey, or cyanide produced by some plants as a defense against being eaten. Bacterial toxins can sometimes be neutralized with antitoxins. Compare antitoxin.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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toxins in Culture

toxins definition


Poisonous substances, consisting mainly of protein, that are a by-product of metabolism in certain organisms. Toxins that enter the body through a bacterial infection can be very harmful and can result in diseases such as tetanus and botulism.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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13
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