treasury

[trezh-uh-ree]
noun, plural treasuries.
1.
a place where the funds of the government, of a corporation, or the like are deposited, kept, and disbursed.
2.
funds or revenue of a government, public or private corporation, etc.
3.
(initial capital letter) the department of government that has control over the collection, management, and disbursement of the public revenue.
4.
a building, room, chest, or other place for the preservation of treasure or valuable objects.
5.
a collection or supply of excellent or highly prized writings, works of art, etc.: a treasury of American poetry.
6.
Treasuries, Informal. Treasury bills, bonds, and notes.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English tresorie < Old French. See treasure, -y3

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
treasury (ˈtrɛʒərɪ)
 
n , pl -uries
1.  a storage place for treasure
2.  the revenues or funds of a government, private organization, or individual
3.  a place where funds are kept and disbursed
4.  Also: treasure house a collection or source of valuable items: a treasury of information
 
[C13: from Old French tresorie, from tresor treasure]

Treasury (ˈtrɛʒərɪ)
 
n
(in various countries) the government department in charge of finance. In Britain the Treasury is also responsible for economic strategy

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

treasury
late 13c., "room for treasure," from O.Fr. tresorie (11c.), from tresor (see treasure). Meaning "department of state that controls public revenue" is recorded from late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Treasury definition


(Matt. 27:6; Mark 12:41; John 8:20). It does not appear that there was a separate building so called. The name was given to the thirteen brazen chests, called "trumpets," from the form of the opening into which the offerings of the temple worshippers were put. These stood in the outer "court of the women." "Nine chests were for the appointed money-tribute and for the sacrifice-tribute, i.e., money-gifts instead of the sacrifices; four chests for freewill-offerings for wood, incense, temple decoration, and burnt-offerings" (Lightfoot's Hor. Heb.).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Treasury won't have enough money to both run the government and pay back our
  lenders.
The euro boasts a common central bank but it lacks a common treasury.
Treasury bond prices and gold have been rising this month as investors seek
  refuge from the turmoil in stocks.
It will create much needed revenue for a cash-strapped treasury.
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