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treatise

[tree-tis] /ˈtri tɪs/
noun
1.
a formal and systematic exposition in writing of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than an essay.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English tretis < Anglo-French tretiz, akin to Old French traitier to treat
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for treatise
  • So what this thread has turned into is a treatise on elitism.
  • The treatise itself begins with entire propriety by defining the science which it is to present.
  • But this is no dry academic treatise on observing animals in the wild.
  • Largely a scholarly treatise, the book sets out to explore what gossip is, how it works and how it has changed over the centuries.
  • That's from the author of this particular medical treatise.
  • It need not be a treatise on accepting non-human intelligence.
  • These were scientists, and they wrote an actual treatise on how long it would take for humanity to be wiped out by zombies.
  • No, this is primarily a moral treatise, not a book about education.
  • In other words, it is as literature and not as a scientific treatise that ideal commonwealths should be considered.
  • No mere dry treatise, the film endeavors to convey the fun and enjoyment of photography to the uninitiated.
British Dictionary definitions for treatise

treatise

/ˈtriːtɪz/
noun
1.
a formal work on a subject, esp one that deals systematically with its principles and conclusions
2.
an obsolete word for narrative
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French tretiz, from Old French tretier to treat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for treatise
n.

c.1300, from Anglo-French tretiz (mid-13c.), contracted from Old French traiteiz, from Gallo-Romance *tractaticius, from Latin tractare "to deal with" (see treat).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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