trumpet

[truhm-pit]
noun
1.
Music.
a.
any of a family of brass wind instruments with a powerful, penetrating tone, consisting of a tube commonly curved once or twice around on itself and having a cup-shaped mouthpiece at one end and a flaring bell at the other.
b.
an organ stop having a tone resembling that of a trumpet.
c.
2.
something used as or resembling a trumpet, especially in sound.
3.
a sound like that of a trumpet.
4.
the loud shrill cry of an animal, especially an elephant.
6.
trumpets, any of several pitcher plants of the southeastern U.S.
verb (used without object)
7.
to blow a trumpet.
8.
to emit a loud, trumpetlike cry, as an elephant.
verb (used with object)
9.
to sound on a trumpet.
10.
to utter with a sound like that of a trumpet.
11.
to proclaim loudly or widely.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English trumpette, trompette < French, equivalent to trompe trump2 + -ette -et

trumpetless, adjective
trumpetlike, adjective
untrumpeted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
trumpet (ˈtrʌmpɪt)
 
n
1.  a valved brass instrument of brilliant tone consisting of a narrow tube of cylindrical bore ending in a flared bell, normally pitched in B flat. Range: two and a half octaves upwards from F sharp on the fourth line of the bass staff
2.  any instrument consisting of a valveless tube ending in a bell, esp a straight instrument used for fanfares, signals, etc
3.  a person who plays a trumpet in an orchestra
4.  a loud sound such as that of a trumpet, esp when made by an animal: the trumpet of the elephants
5.  an eight-foot reed stop on an organ
6.  something resembling a trumpet in shape, esp in having a flared bell
7.  short for ear trumpet
8.  blow one's own trumpet to boast about oneself; brag
 
vb , -pets, -peting, -peted
9.  to proclaim or sound loudly
 
[C13: from Old French trompette a little trump²]
 
'trumpet-like
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

trumpet
c.1300, from O.Fr. trompette "trumpet," dim. of trompe (see trump (n.2)). The verb is recorded from 1530; fig. sense of "to proclaim, extol" is attested from 1581.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

trumpet definition


A brass instrument with a brilliant tone, much used in classical music, as well as in military music and jazz.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

Trumpet definition


A news reader for Microsoft Windows, using the WinSock library. There is also an MS-DOS version. Trumpet is shareware from Australia.
(ftp://ftp.utas.edu.au/pc/trumpet).
(ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/pub/ibmpc/winsock/stacks/trumpwsk/).
news:alt.winsock.trumpet.
[Author?]
(1995-01-12)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

trumpet

in music, brass wind musical instrument sounded by lip vibration against a cup mouthpiece. Ethnologists and ethnomusicologists use the word trumpet for any lip-vibrated instrument, whether of horn, conch, reed, or wood, with a horn or gourd bell, as well as for the Western brass instrument. The technical distinction between trumpet and horn is that one-third of the tube length of a trumpet is conical and two-thirds is cylindrical, while the horn's tube is the opposite. Both types are found throughout the world. For example, non-Western long trumpets are as dispersed as the kakaki of West Africa, the Persian and Arab nafir, the laba of China, and the spectacular dung-chen of the Tibet Autonomous Region of China.

Learn more about trumpet with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Universities are serving themselves here as well, so that they can trumpet how
  diverse they are.
The beasts trumpet loudly, flap their ears and turn in circles.
He owns television stations and newspapers that trumpet his causes and lambast
  his rivals.
No independent scientific researchers trumpet whole-language's virtues.
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