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unbridled

[uhn-brahyd-ld] /ʌnˈbraɪd ld/
adjective
1.
not controlled or restrained:
unbridled enthusiasm.
2.
not fitted with a bridle.
Origin of unbridled
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English unbrydled. See un-1, bridled

unbridle

[uhn-brahyd-l] /ʌnˈbraɪd l/
verb (used with object), unbridled, unbridling.
1.
to remove the bridle from (a horse, mule, etc.).
2.
to free from restraint.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English unbridlen. See un-2, bridle (v.)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for unbridled
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Instead of a hypocritical submission, it was dominated by the fury of unbridled passion.

  • He did not say a word, knowing my unbridled desire to meet danger.

    My Double Life Sarah Bernhardt
  • For seven days, nought but unbridled gayety prevailed in Siegmund's halls.

    The Story of Siegfried James Baldwin
  • They were sufficient proofs of his capacity for unbridled rage.

    The Winning Clue James Hay, Jr.
  • The multitude, "unbridled and heedless," pulled this way and that.

British Dictionary definitions for unbridled

unbridled

/ʌnˈbraɪdəld/
adjective
1.
with all restraints removed
2.
(of a horse, etc) wearing no bridle
Derived Forms
unbridledly, adverb
unbridledness, noun

unbridle

/ʌnˈbraɪdəl/
verb (transitive)
1.
to remove the bridle from (a horse)
2.
to remove all controls or restraints from
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unbridled
adj.

late 14c., originally in figurative sense of "unrestrained, ungoverned," from un- (1) "not" + bridled (see bridle (v.)). Cf. Middle Dutch ongebreidelt. Literal sense of "not fitted with a bridle" (of horses) is not recorded before 1550s. The verb unbridle is attested from c.1400 in the literal sense; mid-15c. in the figurative sense.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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