unsavory

[uhn-sey-vuh-ree]
adjective
1.
not savory; tasteless or insipid: an unsavory meal.
2.
unpleasant in taste or smell; distasteful.
3.
unappealing or disagreeable, as a pursuit: Poor teachers can make education unsavory.
4.
socially or morally objectionable or offensive: an unsavory past; an unsavory person.
Also, especially British, unsavoury.


Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English; see un-1, savory1

unsavorily, adverb
unsavoriness, noun


1. flat, unappetizing.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unsavoury or unsavory (ʌnˈseɪvərɪ)
 
adj
1.  objectionable or distasteful: an unsavoury character
2.  disagreeable in odour or taste
 
unsavory or unsavory
 
adj
 
un'savourily or unsavory
 
adv
 
un'savorily or unsavory
 
adv
 
un'savouriness or unsavory
 
n
 
un'savoriness or unsavory
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unsavory
early 13c., "tasteless, insipid," from un- (1) "not" + savory (adj.). Meaning "unpleasant or disagreeable to the taste" is attested from late 14c.; of persons, from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There are some deeply unsavory opinions in these diversity threads.
Healthy woolly bears also ingest alkaloids, but only in small amounts,
  apparently to make themselves unsavory to predators.
All are impressive locations for unsavory types to plot and scheme.
Words that are vulgar or offensive, or refer to unsavory topics.
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