vet

1 [vet] Informal.
noun
verb (used with object), vetted, vetting.
2.
to examine or treat in one's capacity as a veterinarian or as a doctor.
3.
to appraise, verify, or check for accuracy, authenticity, validity, etc.: An expert vetted the manuscript before publication.
verb (used without object), vetted, vetting.
4.
to work as a veterinarian.

Origin:
1860–65; short for veterinarian

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
vet1 (vɛt)
 
n
1.  short for veterinary surgeon
 
vb , vets, vetting, vetted
2.  chiefly (Brit) (tr) See also positive vetting to make a prior examination and critical appraisal of (a person, document, scheme, etc): the candidates were well vetted
3.  to examine, treat, or cure (an animal)

vet2 (vɛt)
 
n
(US), (Canadian) veteran short for veteran

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vet
1862, shortened form of veterinarian. The verb "to submit (an animal) to veterinary care" is attested from 1891; the colloquial sense of "subject to careful examination" (as of an animal by a veterinarian, especially of a horse before a race) is first attested 1904, in Kipling.

vet
1848, shortened form of veteran.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
vet
  1. veteran

  2. veterinarian

  3. veterinary

The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
It can be tough to figure out what bits of product information have actually
  been vetted by federal regulators.
The words that would ultimately be used to define the requirements of the job
  began to be used and vetted.
The new research has also not been published or vetted by other scientists in
  the field.
The review groups were carefully vetted to exclude anyone with a possibly
  different view.
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