walloping

[wol-uh-ping] Informal.
noun
1.
a sound beating or thrashing.
2.
a thorough defeat.
adjective
3.
impressively big or good; whopping.
adverb
4.
extremely; immensely: We ran up a walloping big bill.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see wallop, -ing1, -ing2

Dictionary.com Unabridged

wallop

[wol-uhp]
verb (used with object)
1.
to beat soundly; thrash.
2.
Informal. to strike with a vigorous blow; belt; sock: After two strikes, he walloped the ball out of the park.
3.
Informal. to defeat thoroughly, as in a game.
4.
Chiefly Scot. to flutter, wobble, or flop about.
verb (used without object)
5.
Informal. to move violently and clumsily: The puppy walloped down the walk.
6.
(of a liquid) to boil violently.
7.
Obsolete. to gallop.
noun
8.
a vigorous blow.
9.
the ability to deliver vigorous blows, as in boxing: That fist of his packs a wallop.
10.
Informal.
a.
the ability to effect a forceful impression; punch: That ad packs a wallop.
b.
a pleasurable thrill; kick: The joke gave them all a wallop.
11.
Informal. a violent, clumsy movement; lurch.
12.
Obsolete. a gallop.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English walopen to gallop, wal(l)op gallop < Anglo-French waloper (v.), walop (noun), Old French galoper, galop; see gallop

walloper, noun
outwallop, verb (used with object)


3. trounce, rout, crush, best.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
wallop (ˈwɒləp)
 
vb , -lops, -loping, -loped
1.  informal (tr) to beat soundly; strike hard
2.  informal (tr) to defeat utterly
3.  dialect (intr) to move in a clumsy manner
4.  (intr) (of liquids) to boil violently
 
n
5.  informal a hard blow
6.  informal the ability to hit powerfully, as of a boxer
7.  informal a forceful impression
8.  (Brit) a slang word for beer
 
vb, —n
9.  an obsolete word for gallop
 
[C14: from Old Northern French waloper to gallop, from Old French galoper, of unknown origin]

walloping (ˈwɒləpɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a thrashing
 
adj
2.  (intensifier): a walloping drop in sales

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wallop
late 14c., "to gallop," possibly from O.N.Fr. *waloper (13c.), probably from Frankish *walalaupan "to run well" (cf. O.H.G. wela "well" and Old Low Franconian loupon "to run, leap"). The verb meaning "to thrash" (1820) and the noun meaning "heavy blow" (1823) may be separate developments, of imitative
origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

wallop definition

[ˈwɑləp]
  1. n.
    a hard blow. : She planted a hard wallop on his right shoulder.
  2. tv.
    to strike someone or something hard. : The door swung open and walloped me in the back.
  3. n.
    influence; pull; clout. : I don't have enough wallop to make that kind of demand.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Example sentences
Martial arts is a whole heck of a lot more than walloping somebody.
Since giving oil bosses a budgetary walloping last year, they have been talking to them about how to keep up investment.
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