wane

[weyn]
verb (used without object), waned, waning.
1.
to decrease in strength, intensity, etc.: Daylight waned, and night came on. Her enthusiasm for the cause is waning.
2.
to decline in power, importance, prosperity, etc.: Colonialism began to wane after World War II.
3.
to draw to a close; approach an end: Summer is waning.
4.
(of the moon) to decrease periodically in the extent of its illuminated portion after the full moon. Compare wax2 ( def 2 ).
noun
5.
a gradual decrease or decline in strength, intensity, power, etc.
6.
the drawing to a close of life, an era, a period, etc.
7.
the waning of the moon.
8.
a period of waning.
9.
a defect in a plank or board characterized by bark or insufficient wood at a corner or along an edge, due to the curvature of the log.
Idioms
10.
on the wane, decreasing; diminishing: The popularity of that song is on the wane.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English wanen (v.), Old English wanian to lessen; cognate with Middle Dutch, Middle High German wanen, Old Norse vana to cause to wane, destroy

unwaned, adjective
unwaning, adjective

wane, wax.


1, 2. diminish, fail, sink. 5. diminution; failure, decay.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wane (weɪn)
 
vb
1.  Compare wax (of the moon) to show a gradually decreasing portion of illuminated surface, between full moon and new moon
2.  to decrease gradually in size, strength, power, etc
3.  to draw to a close
 
n
4.  a decrease, as in size, strength, power, etc
5.  the period during which the moon wanes
6.  the act or an instance of drawing to a close
7.  a rounded surface or defective edge of a plank, where the bark was
8.  on the wane in a state of decline
 
[Old English wanian (vb); related to wan-, prefix indicating privation, wana defect, Old Norse vana]
 
'waney
 
adj
 
'wany
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wane
O.E. wanian "make or become smaller gradually," from P.Gmc. *wanojanan (cf. O.S. wanon, O.N. vana, O.Fris. wania, M.Du. waenen, O.H.G. wanon "to wane, to grow less"), from *wano- "lacking," from PIE *we-no-, from base *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out" (see vain). Related: waned, wanes.

waning
O.E. wanunge, wonunge, from wanian (see wane).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Bidding often is slow until the waning minutes.
With her waning strength, she haltingly dragged a chair several inches out from the table.
The waning moon rose late.
He was half an hour late, and it looked as if her patience was waning.
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