follow Dictionary.com

Denotation vs. Connotation

weald

[weeld] /wild/
noun
1.
wooded or uncultivated country.
Origin of weald
1150
before 1150; Middle English weeld, Old English weald forest; cognate with German Wald; cf. wold1
Can be confused
weald, wield.

Weald

[weeld] /wild/
noun
1.
The, a region in SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and Essex counties: once a forest area; now an agricultural region.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for weald
Historical Examples
  • Calhoun was quite right, but weald in general considered that he'd persuaded the government to take an unreasonable risk.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
  • "We have—ah—verified your statements," said the third voice from weald.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
  • On weald, the government has been buying surplus grain to keep the price up.

    This World Is Taboo Murray Leinster
  • weald plainly maintained a one-planet quarantine against them.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
  • I know of no district so fruitful of these examples as the weald of Kent.

    In Search Of Gravestones Old And Curious W.T. (William Thomas) Vincent
  • The world of weald Three grew brighter and brighter and became a disk.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
  • They'd come from weald in the cargo holds of the liners now transformed into fighting ships.

    This World Is Taboo Murray Leinster
  • Every human being he met on weald wanted to talk about blueskins.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
  • Seated on a promontory herself, she could see the pine-clad promontories descending one beyond another into the weald.

    A Room With A View E. M. Forster
  • The so-far-unexplained bit of news was on the air all over the planet weald.

    Pariah Planet Murray Leinster
British Dictionary definitions for weald

weald

/wiːld/
noun
1.
(Brit, archaic) open or forested country
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Saxon, Old High German wald, Old Norse vollr, probably related to wild

Weald

/wiːld/
noun
1.
the Weald, a region of SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and East and West Sussex between the North Downs and the South Downs: formerly forested
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for weald
n.

Old English (West Saxon) weald "forest, woodland," specifically the forest between the North and South Downs in Sussex, Kent, and Surrey; a West Saxon variant of Anglian wald (see wold).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for weald

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for weald

9
10
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for weald