withal

[with-awl, with-]
adverb
1.
with it all; as well; besides.
2.
in spite of all; nevertheless.
3.
Archaic. with that; therewith.
preposition
4.
with (used after its object).

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English phrase with al(le); replacing Old English mid ealle, mid eallum. See with, all

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World English Dictionary
withal (wɪˈðɔːl)
 
adv
1.  literary as well; likewise
2.  literary nevertheless
3.  archaic therewith
 
prep
4.  (postpositive) an archaic word for with
 
[C12: from with + all]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

withal
"in addition," 1393, from M.E. with alle (c.1200), superseding O.E. mid ealle "wholly" (see with).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Withal, the government exhibited seeming indifference toward appellant.
Withal, the judgment of the state court as to the type and kind of discipline
  is not conclusive for federal disciplinary purposes.
Withal, making particularized judgments in this area on the basis of vague
  etchings of policy is no mean feat.
Withal, the appellant is in a perilously poor position to complain about that
  bad impression.
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