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[with-draw, with-] /wɪðˈdrɔ, wɪθ-/
verb (used with object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
to draw back, away, or aside; take back; remove:
She withdrew her hand from his. He withdrew his savings from the bank.
to retract or recall:
to withdraw an untrue charge.
to cause (a person) to undergo withdrawal from addiction to a substance.
verb (used without object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
to go or move back, away, or aside; retire; retreat:
to withdraw from the room.
to remove oneself from some activity, competition, etc.:
He withdrew before I could nominate him.
to cease using or consuming an addictive narcotic (followed by from):
to withdraw from heroin.
Parliamentary Procedure. to remove an amendment, motion, etc., from consideration.
Origin of withdraw
1175-1225; Middle English withdrawen. See with-, draw
Related forms
withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
withdrawingness, noun
nonwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawing, adjective
2. revoke, rescind, disavow. 4. See depart. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for withdraw
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I thought that the contact was disagreeable; and I endeavoured to withdraw my hand, but could not.

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • But if this goes on, it is the gentlemen who ought to withdraw.

    Malbone Thomas Wentworth Higginson
  • He was to withdraw his army from Syria and to maintain no larger force in Egypt than eighteen thousand men.

  • Send an army into Attica, and compel the Athenians to withdraw their forces from Potidaea.

  • withdraw, my darling; the sight of you—the joy of your very appearance—eh—eh—yes, let me see.

British Dictionary definitions for withdraw


verb -draws, -drawing, -drew, -drawn
(transitive) to take or draw back or away; remove
(transitive) to remove from deposit or investment in a bank, building society, etc
(transitive) to retract or recall (a statement, promise, etc)
(intransitive) to retire or retreat: the troops withdrew
(intransitive) often foll by from. to back out (of) or depart (from): he withdrew from public life
(intransitive) to detach oneself socially, emotionally, or mentally
Derived Forms
withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
Word Origin
C13: from with (in the sense: away from) + draw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for withdraw

early 13c., "to take back," from with "away" + drawen "to draw," possibly a loan-translation of Latin retrahere "to retract." Sense of "to remove oneself" is recorded from c.1300.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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