withdrawn

[with-drawn, with-]

withdrawnness, noun
unwithdrawn, adjective


3. quiet, reserved, aloof, detached.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

withdraw

[with-draw, with-]
verb (used with object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
1.
to draw back, away, or aside; take back; remove: She withdrew her hand from his. He withdrew his savings from the bank.
2.
to retract or recall: to withdraw an untrue charge.
3.
to cause (a person) to undergo withdrawal from addiction to a substance.
verb (used without object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
4.
to go or move back, away, or aside; retire; retreat: to withdraw from the room.
5.
to remove oneself from some activity, competition, etc.: He withdrew before I could nominate him.
6.
to cease using or consuming an addictive narcotic (followed by from ): to withdraw from heroin.
7.
Parliamentary Procedure. to remove an amendment, motion, etc., from consideration.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English withdrawen. See with-, draw

withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
withdrawingness, noun
nonwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawing, adjective


2. revoke, rescind, disavow. 4. See depart.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
withdraw (wɪðˈdrɔː)
 
vb (often foll by from) , -draws, -drawing, -drew, -drawn
1.  (tr) to take or draw back or away; remove
2.  (tr) to remove from deposit or investment in a bank, building society, etc
3.  (tr) to retract or recall (a statement, promise, etc)
4.  (intr) to retire or retreat: the troops withdrew
5.  to back out (of) or depart (from): he withdrew from public life
6.  (intr) to detach oneself socially, emotionally, or mentally
 
[C13: from with (in the sense: away from) + draw]
 
with'drawable
 
adj
 
with'drawer
 
n

withdrawn (wɪðˈdrɔːn)
 
vb
1.  the past participle of withdraw
 
adj
2.  unusually reserved, introverted, or shy
3.  secluded or remote
 
with'drawnness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

withdraw
early 13c., "to take back," from with "away" + drawen "to draw," possibly a loan-translation of L. retrahere "to retract." Sense of "to remove oneself" is recorded from c.1300.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
New bearer cheques could be withdrawn against what had been deposited, subject
  to strict ceilings.
Personally, he was emotionally withdrawn and a heavy drinker.
In order to make the book what it professes to be, each year names have been
  withdrawn and others are included.
One day after notifying campus officials that she planned to take a maternity
  leave, the job offer was withdrawn.
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