yearning

[yur-ning]

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English gierninge. See yearn, -ing1

yearningly, adverb
unyearning, adjective


1. See desire.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

yearn

[yurn]
verb (used without object)
1.
to have an earnest or strong desire; long: to yearn for a quiet vacation.
2.
to feel tenderness; be moved or attracted: They yearned over their delicate child.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English yernen, Old English giernan derivative of georn eager; akin to Old Norse girna to desire, Greek chaírein to rejoice, Sanskrit háryati (he) desires

yearner, noun
unyearned, adjective


1. Yearn, long, hanker, pine all mean to feel a powerful desire for something. Yearn stresses the depth and passionateness of a desire: to yearn to get away and begin a new life; to yearn desperately for recognition. Long implies a wholehearted desire for something that is or seems unattainable: to long to relive one's childhood; to long for the warmth of summer. Hanker suggests a restless or incessant craving to fulfill some urge or desire: to hanker for a promotion; to hanker after fame and fortune. Pine adds the notion of physical or emotional suffering as a result of the real or apparent hopelessness of one's desire: to pine for one's native land; to pine for a lost love.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
yearn (jɜːn)
 
vb (usually foll by for or after or an infinitive)
1.  to have an intense desire or longing (for); pine (for)
2.  to feel tenderness or affection
 
[Old English giernan; related to Old Saxon girnian, Old Norse girna, Gothic gairnjan, Old High German gerōn to long for, Sanskrit haryati he likes]
 
'yearner
 
n

yearning (ˈjɜːnɪŋ)
 
n
an intense or overpowering longing, desire, or need; craving
 
yearningly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

yearn
O.E. geornan (Mercian), giernan (W.Saxon), giorna (Northumbrian), from P.Gmc. *gernijanan (cf. Goth. gairnjan "to desire," Ger. begehren "to desire"), from base *gernaz (cf. O.H.G. gern, O.N. gjarn "desirous," O.E. georn "eager, desirous," Ger. gern "gladly, willingly"), from PIE base *gher- "to like,
want" (see hortatory).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But he is a famous film actor who feeds a popular yearning for heroes, even
  fictional ones.
But it brings you the yearning to know about it, right.
The acclaimed novelist probes our yearning for a fixed address.
Both minimal and magical, it fused the urban art-school ideas of his generation
  with a romantic yearning to be at one with nature.
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