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derive

[dih-rahyv] /dɪˈraɪv/
verb (used with object), derived, deriving.
1.
to receive or obtain from a source or origin (usually followed by from).
2.
to trace from a source or origin.
3.
to reach or obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer.
4.
Chemistry. to produce or obtain (a substance) from another.
verb (used without object), derived, deriving.
5.
to come from a source or origin; originate (often followed by from).
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English diriven, deriven to flow, draw from, spring < Anglo-French, Old French deriver < Latin dērīvāre to lead off, equivalent to dē- de- + rīv(us) a stream + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
derivable, adjective
deriver, noun
nonderivable, adjective
prederive, verb (used with object), prederived, prederiving.
self-derived, adjective
underivable, adjective
well-derived, adjective
Synonyms
1. gain, attain, glean, gather, reap, net.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for deriving
  • Some communities are deriving additional income by producing beeswax candles and other products.
  • Our country is deriving much benefit from having so many higher education graduates from other countries.
  • He imposes personality upon paper rather than deriving, as novelists more customarily do, a paper work from personal sources.
  • In pursuit of it, he conducted elaborate experiments in the science of tea-making, deriving equations for brewing the perfect cup.
  • deriving from the abstract expressionist movement, op art includes paintings concerned with surface kinetics.
  • So here are voices speaking alone, speaking personally, yet drawing strength and deriving character from the group.
  • But her urgent sense of anticipation, deriving from her sensitivity to what is to follow, has a familiar ring.
  • The colliding public responses have been easy to categorize as deriving from either one of two longstanding economic philosophies.
  • The inconsistency simply means deriving different conclusions for the same event.
  • First of all, the experimenters are not deriving the data from a controlled environment.
British Dictionary definitions for deriving

derive

/dɪˈraɪv/
verb
1.
(usually foll by from) to draw or be drawn (from) in source or origin; trace or be traced
2.
(transitive) to obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer
3.
(transitive) to trace the source or development of
4.
(usually foll by from) to produce or be produced (from) by a chemical reaction
5.
(maths) to obtain (a function) by differentiation
Derived Forms
derivable, adjective
deriver, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French deriver to spring from, from Latin dērīvāre to draw off, from de- + rīvus a stream
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deriving

derive

v.

late 14c., from Old French deriver "to flow, pour out; derive, originate," from Latin derivare "to lead or draw off (a stream of water) from its source" (in Late Latin also "to derive"), from phrase de rivo (de "from" + rivus "stream;" see rivulet). Etymological sense is 1550s. Related: Derived; deriving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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deriving in Medicine

derive de·rive (dĭ-rīv')
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives

  1. To obtain or receive from a source.

  2. To produce or obtain a chemical compound from another substance by chemical reaction.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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