Stoicism

Stoicism

[stoh-uh-siz-uhm]
noun
1.
a systematic philosophy, dating from around 300 b.c., that held the principles of logical thought to reflect a cosmic reason instantiated in nature.
2.
(lowercase) conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, as repression of emotion and indifference to pleasure or pain.

Origin:
1620–30; Stoic + -ism


2. See patience.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Stoicism
Collins
World English Dictionary
stoicism (ˈstəʊɪˌsɪzəm)
 
n
1.  indifference to pleasure and pain
2.  (capital) the philosophy of the Stoics

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Stoicism [(stoh-uh-siz-uhm)]

A philosophy that flourished in ancient Greece and Rome. Stoics believed that people should strictly restrain their emotions in order to attain happiness and wisdom; hence, they refused to demonstrate either joy or sorrow.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature